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What would be the best way to model 1 table with multiple 1 to many relatiionships.

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With the above schema if Report contains 1 row, Grant 2 rows and Donation 12. When I join the three together I end up with a Cartesian product and result set of 24. Report joins to Grant and creates 2 rows, then Donation joins on that to make 24 rows.

Is there a better way to model this to avoid the caresian product?

example code

DECLARE @Report
TABLE   (
        ReportID    INT,
        Name        VARCHAR(50)
        )

INSERT
INTO    @Report 
        (
        ReportID,
        Name 
        )

SELECT  1,'Report1'


DECLARE @Grant 
TABLE   (
        GrantID     INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY(GrantID),
        GrantMaker  VARCHAR(50),
        Amount      DECIMAL(10,2),
        ReportID    INT
        )

INSERT
INTO    @Grant 
        (
        GrantMaker,
        Amount,
        ReportID
        )

SELECT  'Grantmaker1',10,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker2',999,1


DECLARE @Donation
TABLE   (
        DonationID      INT IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY(DonationID),
        DonationMaker   VARCHAR(50),
        Amount          DECIMAL(10,2),
        ReportID        INT
        )

INSERT
INTO    @Donation 
        (
        DonationMaker,
        Amount,
        ReportID
        )

SELECT  'Grantmaker1',10,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker2',3434,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker3',45645,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker4',3,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker5',34,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker6',23,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker7',67,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker8',78,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker9',98,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker10',43,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker11',107,1
UNION ALL
SELECT  'Grantmaker12',111,1

SELECT  *
FROM    @Report r
INNER JOIN
        @Grant g
        ON  r.ReportID = g.ReportID 
INNER JOIN
        @Donation d
        ON  r.ReportID = d.ReportID 

Update 1 2011-03-07 15:20

Cheers for the feedback so far, to add to this scenario there are also 15 other 1 to many relationships coming from the one report table. These tables can't for various business reasons be grouped together.

share|improve this question
    
Since you can't break up the relationships, you should select them with different queries, as in my answer. Then in your report or application you display them appropriately. –  Nathan DeWitt Mar 7 '11 at 18:07
    
Yes sorry, I really appreciate your answer but after further consideration I decided catcall explained why what I was saying didn’t quite make sense, then as you did added detail on a possible solution and also a bonus example depending on my requirements. Cheers again though. –  Pixelated Mar 8 '11 at 11:22
    
ok, thanks for the explanation. it's good to know how i can improve my answers. –  Nathan DeWitt Mar 8 '11 at 13:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you're going to join on ReportID, then no, you can't avoid a lot of rows. When you omit the table "Report", and just join "Donation" to "Grant" on ReportId, you still get 24 rows.

SELECT  *
FROM    Grant g
INNER JOIN
        Donation d
        ON  g.ReportID = d.ReportID 

But the essential point is that it doesn't make sense in the real world to match up donations and grants. They're completely independent things that essentially have nothing to do with each other.

In the database, the statement immediately above will join each row in Grants to every matching row in Donation. The resulting 24 rows really shouldn't surprise you.

When you need to present independent things to the user, you should use a report writer or web application (for example) that selects the independent things, well, independently. Select donations and put them into one section of a report or web page, then select grants and put them into another section of the report or web page, and so on.

If the table "Report" is supposed to help you record which sections go into a particular report, then you need a structure more like this:

create table reports (
    reportid integer primary key,
    report_name varchar(35) not null unique
);

create table report_sections (
    reportid integer not null references reports (reportid),
    section_name varchar(35),  -- Might want to reference a table of section names
    section_order integer not null,
    primary key (reportid, section_name)
);
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Catcall, many thanks for the great response. The reason I've got this issue is because there is a balance sheet section with 100+columns. I decided to break the columns out to separate tables to help performance. Each column can have 5 rows depending on the type of balance sheet value being entered. However now I've got the above issue when trying to join the balance sheet tables back up again. There is a work around which involves joining on reportID and ValueType but I’m sure this isn’t correct design. –  Pixelated Mar 7 '11 at 16:40
    
Without thinking about it too much, I think you have two viable alternatives--a report writer, or a temporary table. I'd use a report writer, myself. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 7 '11 at 17:42

Is there any relationship at all between Grants and Donations? If there isn't, does it make sense to pull back a query that shows a pseudo relationship between them?

I'd do one query for grants:

SELECT r.*, g.*
FROM @Report r
JOIN @Grant g ON r.ReportID = g.ReportID

And another for donations:

SELECT r.*, d.*
FROM @Report r
JOIN @Donation d ON r.ReportID = d.ReportID

Then let your application show the appropriate data.

However, if Grants and Donations are similar, then just make a more generic table such as Contributions.

Contributions
-------------
ContributionID (PK)
Maker
Amount
Type
ReportID (FK)

Now your query is:

SELECT r.*, c.*
FROM @Report r
JOIN @Contribution c ON r.ReportID = c.ReportID
WHERE c.Type = 'Grant' -- or Donation, depending on the application
share|improve this answer

The donation and grant tables look almost identical. You could make them one table and add a column that is something like DonationType. Would reduce complexity by 1 table. Now if donations and grants are completely different and have different subtables associated with them then keeping them seperate and only joining on one at a time would be ideal.

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