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I'm writing a serial port software for Windows. To improve performance I'm trying to convert the routines to use asynchronous I/O. I have the code up and working fairly well, but I'm a semi-beginner at this, and I would like to improve the performance of the program further. During stress tests of the program (ie burst data to/from the port as fast as possible at high baudrate), the CPU load gets quite high.

If anyone out there has experience from asynchronous I/O and multi-threading in Windows, I'd be grateful if you could take a look at my program. I have two main concerns:

  • Is the asynchronous I/O implemented correctly? I found some fairly reliable source on the net suggesting that you can pass user data to the callback functions, by implementing your own OVERLAPPED struct with your own data at the end. This seems to be working just fine, but it does look a bit "hackish" to me. Also, the program's performance didn't improve all that much when I converted from synchronous/polled to asynchronous/callback, making me suspect I'm doing something wrong.

  • Is it sane to use STL std::deque for the FIFO data buffers? As the program is currently written, I only allow 1 byte of data to be received at a time, before it must be processed. Because I don't know how much data I will receive, it could be endless amounts. I assume this 1-byte-at-a-time will yield sluggish behaviour behind the lines of deque when it has to allocate data. And I don't trust deque to be thread-safe either (should I?). If using STL deque isn't sane, are there any suggestions for a better data type to use? Static array-based circular ring buffer?

Any other feedback on the code is most welcome as well.


The serial routines are implemented so that I have a parent class called "Comport", which handles everything serial I/O related. From this class I inherit another class called "ThreadedComport", which is a multi-threaded version.

ThreadedComport class (relevant parts of it)

class ThreadedComport : public Comport
{
  private:

    HANDLE        _hthread_port;                 /* thread handle      */
    HANDLE        _hmutex_port;                  /* COM port access    */
    HANDLE        _hmutex_send;                  /* send buffer access */
    HANDLE        _hmutex_rec;                   /* rec buffer access  */

    deque<uint8>  _send_buf;
    deque<uint8>  _rec_buf;
    uint16        _data_sent;
    uint16        _data_received;

    HANDLE        _hevent_kill_thread;
    HANDLE        _hevent_open;
    HANDLE        _hevent_close;
    HANDLE        _hevent_write_done;
    HANDLE        _hevent_read_done;
    HANDLE        _hevent_ext_send;              /* notifies external thread */
    HANDLE        _hevent_ext_receive;           /* notifies external thread */

    typedef struct
    {
      OVERLAPPED       overlapped;
      ThreadedComport* caller;                  /* add user data to struct */
    } OVERLAPPED_overlap;

    OVERLAPPED_overlap _send_overlapped;
    OVERLAPPED_overlap _rec_overlapped;
    uint8*             _write_data;
    uint8              _read_data;
    DWORD              _bytes_read;

    static DWORD WINAPI _tranceiver_thread (LPVOID param);
    void                _send_data         (void);
    void                _receive_data      (void);
    DWORD               _wait_for_io       (void);

    static void WINAPI  _send_callback     (DWORD dwErrorCode,
                                            DWORD dwNumberOfBytesTransfered,
                                            LPOVERLAPPED lpOverlapped);
    static void WINAPI  _receive_callback  (DWORD dwErrorCode,
                                            DWORD dwNumberOfBytesTransfered,
                                            LPOVERLAPPED lpOverlapped);

};

The main thread routine created through CreateThread():

DWORD WINAPI ThreadedComport::_tranceiver_thread (LPVOID param)
{
  ThreadedComport* caller = (ThreadedComport*) param;

  HANDLE handle_array [3] =
  {
    caller->_hevent_kill_thread,                 /* WAIT_OBJECT_0 */
    caller->_hevent_open,                        /* WAIT_OBJECT_1 */
    caller->_hevent_close                        /* WAIT_OBJECT_2 */
  };

  DWORD result;

  do
  {
    /* wait for anything to happen */
    result = WaitForMultipleObjects(3,
                                    handle_array,
                                    false,       /* dont wait for all */
                                    INFINITE);

    if(result == WAIT_OBJECT_1 )                 /* open? */
    {
      do                                         /* while port is open, work */
      {
        caller->_send_data();
        caller->_receive_data();
        result = caller->_wait_for_io();         /* will wait for the same 3 as in handle_array above,
                                                    plus all read/write specific events */

      } while (result != WAIT_OBJECT_0 &&        /* while not kill thread */
               result != WAIT_OBJECT_2);         /* while not close port */
    }
    else if(result == WAIT_OBJECT_2)             /* close? */
    {
      ;                                          /* do nothing */
    }

  } while (result != WAIT_OBJECT_0);             /* kill thread? */

  return 0;
}

which in turn calls the following three functions:

void ThreadedComport::_send_data (void)
{
  uint32 send_buf_size;

  if(_send_buf.size() != 0)                      // anything to send?
  {
    WaitForSingleObject(_hmutex_port, INFINITE);
      if(_is_open)                               // double-check port
      {
        bool result;

        WaitForSingleObject(_hmutex_send, INFINITE);
          _data_sent = 0;
          send_buf_size = _send_buf.size();
          if(send_buf_size > (uint32)_MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH)
          {
            send_buf_size = _MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH;
          }
          _write_data = new uint8 [send_buf_size];


          for(uint32 i=0; i<send_buf_size; i++)
          {
            _write_data[i] = _send_buf.front();
            _send_buf.pop_front();
          }
          _send_buf.clear();
        ReleaseMutex(_hmutex_send);


        result = WriteFileEx (_hcom,              // handle to output file
                              (void*)_write_data, // pointer to input buffer
                              send_buf_size,      // number of bytes to write
                              (LPOVERLAPPED)&_send_overlapped, // pointer to async. i/o data
                              (LPOVERLAPPED_COMPLETION_ROUTINE )&_send_callback);

        SleepEx(INFINITE, true);                 // Allow callback to come

        if(result == false)
        {
          // error handling here
        }

      } // if(_is_open)
    ReleaseMutex(_hmutex_port);
  }
  else /* nothing to send */
  {
    SetEvent(_hevent_write_done);                // Skip write
  }
}


void ThreadedComport::_receive_data (void)
{
  WaitForSingleObject(_hmutex_port, INFINITE);

    if(_is_open)
    {
      BOOL  result;

      _bytes_read = 0;
      result = ReadFileEx (_hcom,                  // handle to output file
                           (void*)&_read_data,     // pointer to input buffer
                           1,                      // number of bytes to read
                           (OVERLAPPED*)&_rec_overlapped, // pointer to async. i/o data
                           (LPOVERLAPPED_COMPLETION_ROUTINE )&_receive_callback);

      SleepEx(INFINITE, true);                     // Allow callback to come

      if(result == FALSE)
      {
        DWORD last_error = GetLastError();
        if(last_error == ERROR_OPERATION_ABORTED)  // disconnected ?
        {
          close();                                 // close the port
        }
      }
    }

  ReleaseMutex(_hmutex_port);
}



DWORD ThreadedComport::_wait_for_io (void)
{
  DWORD result;
  bool  is_write_done = false;
  bool  is_read_done  = false;

  HANDLE handle_array [5] =
  {
    _hevent_kill_thread,
    _hevent_open,
    _hevent_close,
    _hevent_write_done,
    _hevent_read_done
  };


  do /* COM port message pump running until sending / receiving is done */
  {
    result = WaitForMultipleObjects(5,
                        handle_array,
                        false,                     /* dont wait for all */
                        INFINITE);

    if(result <= WAIT_OBJECT_2)
    {
      break;                                       /* abort */
    }
    else if(result == WAIT_OBJECT_3)               /* write done */
    {
      is_write_done = true;
      SetEvent(_hevent_ext_send);
    }
    else if(result == WAIT_OBJECT_4)               /* read done */
    {
      is_read_done = true;

      if(_bytes_read > 0)
      {
        uint32 errors = 0;

        WaitForSingleObject(_hmutex_rec, INFINITE);
          _rec_buf.push_back((uint8)_read_data);
          _data_received += _bytes_read;

          while((uint16)_rec_buf.size() > _MAX_MESSAGE_LENGTH)
          {
            _rec_buf.pop_front();
          }

        ReleaseMutex(_hmutex_rec);
        _bytes_read = 0;

        ClearCommError(_hcom, &errors, NULL);
        SetEvent(_hevent_ext_receive);
      }
    }
  } while(!is_write_done || !is_read_done);

  return result;
}

Asynchronous I/O callback functions:

void WINAPI ThreadedComport::_send_callback (DWORD dwErrorCode,
                                             DWORD dwNumberOfBytesTransfered,
                                             LPOVERLAPPED lpOverlapped)
{
  ThreadedComport* _this = ((OVERLAPPED_overlap*)lpOverlapped)->caller;

  if(dwErrorCode == 0)                           // no errors
  {
    if(dwNumberOfBytesTransfered > 0)
    {
      _this->_data_sent = dwNumberOfBytesTransfered;
    }
  }


  delete [] _this->_write_data;                  /* always clean this up */
  SetEvent(lpOverlapped->hEvent);
}


void WINAPI ThreadedComport::_receive_callback (DWORD dwErrorCode,
                                                DWORD dwNumberOfBytesTransfered,
                                                LPOVERLAPPED lpOverlapped)
{
  if(dwErrorCode == 0)                           // no errors
  {
    if(dwNumberOfBytesTransfered > 0)
    {
      ThreadedComport* _this = ((OVERLAPPED_overlap*)lpOverlapped)->caller;
      _this->_bytes_read = dwNumberOfBytesTransfered;
    }
  }

  SetEvent(lpOverlapped->hEvent);
}
share|improve this question
    
I successfully removed the SleepEx() functions and changed one of the WaitForMultipleObjects to the "Ex" version. It works well although I can't spot any visible change in performance. I suppose the time it takes starting up the ReadFileEx() and WriteFileEx() is next to none. –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 9:36
    
Did further modifications to the code. First I changed the write/rec array buffers to fixed size. This makes the program consume a fair bit more RAM, but there are no notable performance changes. Second, I allowed more than 1 byte incoming data. As suspected, it gave a notable performance boost. For the record I'm still sticking to std:deque, and std:copying the raw uint8 array into the deque with back_inserter. So the STL implementation seems quite effective (Dinkumware STL, part of Embarcadero Builder 2009). –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 10:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first question is simple. The method is not hackish; you own the OVERLAPPED memory and everything that follows it. This is best described by Raymond Chen: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2010/12/17/10106259.aspx

You would only expect a performance improvement if you've got better things to while waiting for the I/O to complete. If all you do is SleepEx, you'll only see CPU% go down. The clue is in the name "overlapped" - it allows you to overlap calculations and I/O.

std::deque<unsigned char> can handle FIFO data without big problems. It will probably recycle 4KB chunks (precise number determined by extensive profiling, all done for you).

[edit] I've looked into your code a bit further, and it seems the code is needlessly complex. For starters, one of the main benefits of asynchronous I/O is that you don't need all that thread stuff. Threads allow you to use more cores, but you're dealing with a slow I/O device. Even a single core is sufficient, if it doesn't spend all its time waiting. And that's precisely what overlapped I/O is for. You just dedicate one thread to all I/O work for the port. Since it's the only thread, it doesn't need a mutex to access that port.

OTOH, you would want a mutex around the deque<uint8> objects since the producer/consumer threads aren't the same as the comport thread.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply. It is good to know that neither the OVERLAPPED nor the deque should cause issues. The reason I'm using a thread for this is to reduce lag in the main program. I've seen far too many flawed program designs doing I/O from their main GUI thread to trust it. I expect the I/O pace to be quite high, and I wouldn't want it to come in and interrupt the main program. Though I admit that the thread is a remain from when the code used synchronous I/O. I think I should make an attempt to start both the read and writes at the same time, before starting SleepEx(). –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 7:52
    
Both deques are protected by their own mutex (_hmutex_rec and _hmutex_send). –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 7:52
    
It's a serial port. You will not overload a modern CPU. We've been doing serial port communications since at least the 8080 era, and they reached their current top speeds (115K2) in the 8086 era. Those were 3-4 orders of magnitude slower than todays CPU's. –  MSalters Mar 8 '11 at 8:01
    
Oh yeah but 8086 didn't have MS Windows dragging it down. In my experience, pretty much any 8-bit MCU outperforms a Windows PC when it comes to serial communication. The reason I started dissecting this code is because the GUI lagged when exposed to continuous floods of data at 115kpbs or 256kbps. I knew from the start that the GUI in itself was the culprit, though I wanted to optimize the serial routines as far as possible before re-designing the GUI. –  Lundin Mar 9 '11 at 7:49

I don't see any reason for using asynchronous I/O in a project like this. Asynchronous I/O is good when you're handling a large number of sockets or have work to do while waiting for data, but as far as I can tell, you're only dealing with a single socket and not doing any work in between.

Also, just for the sake of knowledge, you would normally use an I/O completion port to handle your asynchronous I/O. I'm not sure if there are any situations where using an I/O completion port has a negative impact on performance.

But yes, your asynchronous I/O usage looks okay. Implementing your own OVERLAPPED struct does look like a hack, but it is correct; there's no other way to associate your own data with the completion.

Boost also has a circular buffer implementation, though I'm not sure if it's thread safe. None of the standard library containers are thread safe, though.

share|improve this answer

I think that your code has suboptimal design.

  • You are sharing too many data structures with too many threads, I guess. I think that you should put all handling of the serial device IO for one port into a single thread and put a synchronized command/data queue between the IO thread and all client threads. Have the IO thread watch out for commands/data in the queue.

  • You seem to be allocating and freeing some buffers for each sent event. Avoid that. If you keep all the IO in a single thread, you can reuse a single buffer. You are limiting the size of the message anyway, you can just pre-allocate a single big enough buffer.

  • Putting the bytes that you want to send into a std::deque is suboptimal. You have to serialize them into a continuous memory block for the WriteFile(). Instead, if you use some sort of commdand/data queue between one IO thread and other threads, you can have the client threads provide the continuous chunk of memory at once.

  • Reading 1 byte at a time seem silly, too. Unless it does not work for serial devices, you could provide large enough buffer to ReadFileEx(). It returns how many bytes it has actually managed to read. It should not block, AFAIK, unless of course I am wrong.

  • You are waiting for the overlapped IO to finish using the SleepEx() invocation. What is the point of the overlapped IO then if you are just ending up being synchronous?

share|improve this answer
    
And instead of sleeping alertably, why not just wait on the completion event alertably - that way you'll get woken up when the I/O completes instead of never. –  Larry Osterman Mar 7 '11 at 16:15
    
@wilx Thanks for your reply. I don't see how I'm sharing too many data structures, every private variable is non-static and thus passed through the caller parameter, meaning that each instance of the class will have its own set of data. Regarding the dynamic allocation, it does indeed seem needlessly complex. I will try to change it to a static buffer. –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 8:46
    
@wilx Regarding WriteFile(), I'm not sure how it is possible to use a single buffer? That means that the application will have to wait out the thread to finish each time it wants to access the data, which would be unacceptable and make multi-threading pointless. The big resource thief is the data shovelling between WriteFile's buffer and the program buffer (be it a deque or anything else), but I see no way to avoid that? –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 8:49
    
@wilx I could set a timeout for the ReadFileEx() and WaitForSingleObject. But the timeout would have to be so small I doubt there is any point with it. I guess I could experiment with it and see if it improves the performance. –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 8:55
    
@Larry What do you mean with never waking up? The SleepEx() documentation states that it wakes up as soon as the callback is executed. –  Lundin Mar 8 '11 at 8:58

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