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I need to parse a website which has a lot of nested <div>s all over. I tried with XML::Simple to get a nice tree-structure, but the parse fails all the time because there seems to be two or three not closed <p> somewhere. I tried HTML::Parser, but that only lets me define some handler functions that give me the right tags, but not their nested elements.

There any way to get XML::Simple accept non-valid XML or HTML::Parser to give me a handy tree structure?

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Try [Web::Scraper][] instead. [Web::Scraper]: search.cpan.org/perldoc/Web::Scraper –  Matt Ball Mar 7 '11 at 15:33
    
Try HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath instead. –  daxim Mar 7 '11 at 15:35
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HTML is not XML. Why would you expect an XML parser to parse it? –  Wooble Mar 7 '11 at 15:40
    
@Wooble Because, at my heart, I wish it was. –  Lambda Dusk Mar 7 '11 at 15:44
    
An alternative to something based on [HTML::TreeBuilder][] is [XML::LibXML->load_html(...)][XML::LibXML::Parser load_html]. [HTML::TreeBuilder]: search.cpan.org/perldoc/HTML::TreeBuilder [XML::LibXML::Parser load_html]: search.cpan.org/perldoc/XML::LibXML::Parser#DOM_Parser –  reinierpost Mar 7 '11 at 16:15
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The HTML::TreeBuilder builds nice trees and gives tons of handy methods to traverse it.

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The TreeBuilder did it for me. The server I am working on does not have XML::LibXML and I cannot install it. So many thanks for your help! –  Lambda Dusk Mar 10 '11 at 13:34
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An alternative to something based on HTML::TreeBuilder is XML::LibXML->load_html(...).

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But is it valid HTML? If so, XML::LibXML will do a marvelous job if you use the HTML parsing functions. It is lightning fast and provides a great interface. It should even be able to handle some bad HTML using the recover option.

Alternatively, HTML::Parser (often used via HTML::TreeBuilder or HTML::TreeBuilder::XPath) is renown for handling bad HTML. It won't be as fast, though.

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