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Is there anyway way to prevent a class having static instances of it created in C#. I don't think there is but it could be useful. E.g just some attribute to prevent it.

something like this

[NoStaticInstances]
public class MyClass {
}

so that

public static MyClass _myClass;

would cause an error?

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1  
What is a static instance? –  smartcaveman Mar 7 '11 at 16:29
    
Sorry I think I asked a stupid question after thinking about it :) I guess there is really no way such a feature could work. –  Paul Johnson Mar 7 '11 at 16:35
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you can do is the following:

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass()
    {
#if DEBUG // Only run in debug mode, because of performance.
        StackTrace trace = new StackTrace();

        var callingMethod = trace.GetFrames()[1].GetMethod();

        if (callingMethod.IsStatic && 
            callingMethod.Name == ".cctor")
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "You naughty boy!");
        }
#endif
    }
}

Static fields will 'normally' be created by static constructors. What the above code does is looking at the calling method to see if it is a static constructor and if that's the case, throw an exception.

Note however, that this check is quite fragile and smart users can easily work around this by refactoring the creation of this method to another method. In other words, I agree with every body else that there is no good way to do this.

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Cool this does what I wanted thank you. It doesn't matter if it can be worked around in my case I just wanted to help prevent mistakes being made so this is ideal. –  Paul Johnson Mar 7 '11 at 16:42
    
@Paul: Please do note that this pretty slow, so you might want to consider only running this in debug mode. See my update. –  Steven Mar 7 '11 at 18:15
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There's no such thing as a "static instance" - there's only a static variable, which is assigned a value. And there's no way of preventing static variables of a particular type being declared, unless you make the type itself static, which will prevent any instances being created and any variables of that type from being declared.

Imagine if your desired feature did exist... how would you expect the following code to behave?

class Test
{
    static object foo;

    static void Main()
    {
        MyClass bar = new MyClass();
        foo = bar;
    }
}

Which line of that would cause an error, if any? If it's the assignment, imagine this instead:

class Test
{
    static object foo;

    static void Main()
    {
        MyClass bar = new MyClass();
        object tmp = bar;
        foo = tmp;
    }
}

In short, I don't think you're going to be able to prevent static variables holding references to instances of your class. Out of interest, why do you want to?

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Its just to prevent mistakes being made in the use of a login helper. If its stored as static in a web application then there are problems. I probably need to change the login helper so it can be made static. –  Paul Johnson Mar 7 '11 at 16:24
1  
I understand that you try to prevent other developers from making mistakes, but were to stop? There are so many things developers can do wrong. You better write good (xml) documentation that explains this clearly. Writing FxCop rules could also be a good option, but this is typically pretty time consuming. –  Steven Mar 7 '11 at 16:32
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Such a restriction would not make sense.

What if you write

static object something = new YourClass();
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I figured it didn't exist. If it did then the code above would ideally cause a compile error in much the same way as if you tried to create an instance of an abstract class. –  Paul Johnson Mar 7 '11 at 16:26
    
@Paul: What if you assign it through a temporary local? –  SLaks Mar 7 '11 at 16:34
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Not really, there is no language or compiler feature that supports this.

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No, there's no way to dictate the scope or lifetime of object references in C#.

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