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I recently read about the fact that there is a possibility of defining getters/setters in JavaScript. It seems extremely helpful - the setter is a kind of 'helper' which can parse the value to be set first, before actually setting it.

For example, I currently have this code:

var obj = function(value) {
    var test = !!value; // 'test' has to be a boolean
    return {
        get test() { return test },
        set test(value) { test = !!value }
    };
};

var instance = new obj(true);

This code always converts value to a boolean. So if you code instance.test = 0, then instance.test === false.

However, for this to work you have to actually return an object, which means that the new instance is not of type obj but just is a plain object. This means that changing the prototype of obj has no effect on instances. For example, this does not work - instance.func is undefined:

obj.prototype.func = function() { console.log(this.value); };

because instance is not of type obj. To get the prototype functions work, I guess I should not return a plain object, but rather not return anything so that instance would just be of type obj, like a regular constructor works.

The problem then is how to implement getters/setters? I can only find articles describing how to add these to an object, not as being part of the constructor of a custom type.

So how do I implement getters/setters in the constructor so as to be able to both use getters/setters and extending the prototype?

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2  
Read this article before you get too fired up about these things :-) –  Pointy Mar 7 '11 at 16:36
1  
@Pointy watch out with those thing. Yes there slower but I doubt it can cause a notable bottleneck in almost all cases. –  Raynos Mar 7 '11 at 16:42
1  
Thanks for that article. I haven't experienced any performance breakdowns though. –  pimvdb Mar 7 '11 at 16:45
    
@Pointy That link is dead now, could you provide an alternative? Curious what it entails. –  ApathyBear Mar 25 at 4:57
    
@ApathyBear darn it, it was dumb to use a link shortener for that. I think it was something about runtime performance. Somebody asked a question with a jsperf about why getter/setter functions are so slow just recently (they're not that slow, just slower than you'd think they'd be). –  Pointy Mar 25 at 13:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can't do that.

You can set setter/getters for properties of objects though. I advice you use ES5 Object.defineProperties though. of course this only works in modern browsers.

var obj = function() {
    ...
    Object.defineProperties(this, {
        "test": {
             "get": function() { ... },
             "set": function() { ... }
        }
    });
}

obj.prototype.func = function() { ... }

var o = new obj;
o.test;
o.func();
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This works great. It's a little more typing though, but a clear solution nevertheless. –  pimvdb Mar 7 '11 at 16:41
2  
This is great. I wish the syntax was a little cleaner but it works. I kind of wish you could do this.myProp = get () { } like you can with normal functions. –  Alex Ford Jun 20 '13 at 23:02

I know this might be extremely late but I figured out a different way to accomplish what you want and for the sake of people, like myself, googling for an answer to this here it is.

function Constructor(input){
     this.input = input;
}
Object.__defineGetter__.call(Constructor.prototype, "value", function(){
    return this.input * 2;
});

var test = new Constructor(5);
alert(test.value) // 10

I've tested this in chrome, safari, mobile safari, firefox and they all work (latest versions of course)

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Thanks, that works great! –  pimvdb Aug 9 '11 at 20:26
    
I'm not sure this works cross-browser, but even if it does it's really gross looking. Is there any reason why you would go this route instead of using defineProperties() as @Raynos did? –  Alex Ford Jun 20 '13 at 23:05
    
Fair warning, this syntax is deprecated. Going forward for modern browsers the appropriate syntax is Object.defineProperty(someObject, 'somePropertyName', { get: function(){}, set: function(val){} }). –  Hallmanac Feb 28 at 17:24

@Alex I see it as more option and more power, programming is art, @Nat share his finding with us, and for that I thank him. Maybe someone want to do it that way.

I'm sure the setter version is the same but just changing that g to a s.

i.g:

function Constructor(input){
     this.input = input;
}

Object.__defineGetter__.call(Constructor.prototype, "value", function(){
    return this.input * 2;
});

Object.__defineSetter__.call(Constructor.prototype, "bar", function(foo){
    return this.input *= foo;
});

var test = new Constructor(5);
console.log(test.value); // 10
test.bar = 5;
console.log(test.input); //25

With that said, this feature is deprecated, advices to not to use in production coding.

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