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I ran across a pattern in a codebase I'm working on today that initially seemed extremely clever, then later drove me insane, and now I'm wondering if there's a way to rescue the clever part while minimizing the insanity.

We have a bunch of objects that implement IContractObject, and a class InvariantChecker that looks like this:

internal class InvariantChecker : IDisposable
{
    private IContractObject obj;

    public InvariantChecker(IContractObject obj)
    {
        this.obj = obj;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (!obj.CheckInvariants())
        {
            throw new ContractViolatedException();
        }
    }
}

internal class Foo : IContractObject
{
    private int DoWork()
    {
        using (new InvariantChecker(this))
        {
            // do some stuff
        }
        // when the Dispose() method is called here, we'll throw if the work we
        // did invalidated our state somehow
    }
}

This is used to provide a relatively painless runtime validation of state consistency. I didn't write this, but it initially seemed like a pretty cool idea.

However, the problem arises if Foo.DoWork throws an exception. When the exception is thrown, it's likely that we're in an inconsistent state, which means that the InvariantChecker also throws, hiding the original exception. This may happen several times as the exception propagates up the call stack, with an InvariantChecker at each frame hiding the exception from the frame below. In order to diagnose the problem, I had to disable the throw in the InvariantChecker, and only then could I see the original exception.

This is obviously terrible. However, is there any way to rescue the cleverness of the original idea without getting the awful exception-hiding behavior?

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6  
This is horrid. –  Jason Mar 7 '11 at 16:46
    
Isn't there a rule that destructors should do everything they can to avoid throwing exception? –  driushkin Mar 7 '11 at 17:11
    
It is a beautiful example of the consequences of IDisposable abuse. And CA1065, two for one. –  Hans Passant Mar 7 '11 at 17:48

7 Answers 7

Instead of this:

using (new InvariantChecker(this)) {
  // do some stuff
}

Just do this (assuming you don't return from do some stuff):

// do some stuff
this.EnforceInvariants();

If you need to return from do some stuff, I believe some refactoring is in order:

DoSomeStuff(); // returns void
this.EnforceInvariants();

...

var result = DoSomeStuff(); // returns non-void
this.EnforceInvariants();
return result;

It's simpler and you won't have the problems you were having before.

You just need a simple extension method:

public static class InvariantEnforcer {
  public static void EnforceInvariants(this IContractObject obj) {
    if (!obj.CheckInvariants()) {
      throw new ContractViolatedException();
    }
  }
}
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This is basically the same as John Skeet's solution. –  JSBձոգչ Mar 7 '11 at 18:02
    
@JSBangs: No, it isn't. His solution uses delegates. –  Jordão Mar 7 '11 at 18:05

What is needed to make this nice is a clean means of finding out whether an exception is pending when Dispose is called. Either Microsoft should provide a standardized means of finding out at any time what exception (if any) will be pending when the current try-finally block exits, or Microsoft should support an extended Dispose interface (perhaps DisposeEx, which would inherit Dispose) which would accept a pending-exception parameter.

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If you current problem is to get original exception - go to Debug -> Exceptions and check "thrown" for all CLR exceptions. It will break when exception is thrown and as result you'll see it first. You may need to also turn off tools->options->debug->"my code only" option if exceptions are throw from "not your code" from VS point of view.

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I don't like the idea of overloading the meaning of using in this way. Why not have a static method which takes a delegate type instead? So you'd write:

InvariantChecker.Check(this, () =>
{
    // do some stuff
});

Or even better, just make it an extension method:

this.CheckInvariantActions(() =>
{
    // do some stuff
});

(Note that the "this" part is needed in order to get the C# compiler to look for extension methods that are applicable to this.) This also allows you to use a "normal" method to implement the action, if you want, and use a method group conversion to create a delegate for it. You might also want to allow it to return a value if you would sometimes want to return from the body.

Now CheckInvariantActions can use something like:

action();
if (!target.CheckInvariants())
{
    throw new ContractViolatedException();
}

I would also suggest that CheckInvariants should probably throw the exception directly, rather than just returning bool - that way the exception can give information about which invariant was violated.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Also I think "using" is easier to debug (delegates generate non-obvious stacks that jump in and out the same function, also it is likely only strange for people who were born before LINQ) and "using" version generates twice less code (you get delegate overhead and you still need try/finally inside the CheckInvariantActions). –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 7 '11 at 17:21
    
@Alexei: No, you don't need try/finally - the OP doesn't want to perform the checks if the action throws an exception. –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '11 at 18:59
    
I read OP post as "I'm happy with contract verification, but I want to know what failed", your reading "I like cool code and need contract verification is only for success cases" is lilky close to original meaning. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 7 '11 at 19:23

If you really want to do this:

internal class InvariantChecker : IDisposable
{
    private IContractObject obj;

    public InvariantChecker(IContractObject obj)
    {
        this.obj = obj;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (Marshal.GetExceptionCode() != 0xCCCCCCCC && obj.CheckInvariants())
        {
            throw new ContractViolatedException();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It would seem nicer if instead of just stifling the ContractViolatedException when a pending exception exists, the pending exception could be wrapped within the ContractViolatedException. Could you show that? –  supercat Mar 7 '11 at 17:03
    
@supercat: That is non-trivial and left as an exercise for the reader :) –  Matt Howells Mar 7 '11 at 17:07

This is a horrid abuse of the using pattern. The using pattern is for disposing of unmanaged resources, not for "clever" tricks like this. I suggest just writing straight forward code.

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Actually, this is minor variation of what I refer to as the "scope" pattern, and it's extremely useful when used properly. Like the TransactionScope object in the Transactions namespace of the Framework. –  Toby Mar 7 '11 at 16:53
    
I think that the using pattern can be used for "clever" tricks, albeit this isn't a very good one. I like the way the ASP.Net MVC team used it to start/end FORMS though –  Francisco Noriega Mar 7 '11 at 16:55
    
I've seen this done in other places too. For example, SharePoint has a SPMonitoredScope object that is used for writing execution information to the logs that uses this pattern too. –  Kyle Trauberman Mar 7 '11 at 16:56
    
@Toby: Very different. TransactionScope wraps an unmanaged resource, and unrolling the transaction on failure is part of its cleanup. –  Jason Mar 7 '11 at 16:56
    
@Jason: The same issues exist with unmanaged cleanup as exist here--unmanaged cleanup should not let execution continue undisturbed if the class invariants for the external entity being cleaned up cannot be met, but it's annoying when cleanup code throws an exception which obscures an already-existing one. –  supercat Mar 7 '11 at 17:02

Add a property to the InvariantChecker class that allows you to suppress the check/throw.

internal class InvariantChecker : IDisposable
{
    private IContractObject obj;

    public InvariantChecker(IContractObject obj)
    {
        this.obj = obj;
    }

    public bool Suppress { get; set; }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (!this.Suppress)
        {
            if (!obj.CheckInvariants())
            {
                throw new ContractViolatedException();
            }
        }
    }
}

internal class Foo : IContractObject
{
    private int DoWork()
    {
        using (var checker = new InvariantChecker(this))
        {
            try
            {
                // do some stuff
            }
            catch
            {
                checker.Suppress = true;
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This is horridness on top of horridness. –  Jason Mar 7 '11 at 16:50
    
I still disagree that it's as bad as you make it out to be, but I concur that Jon's pattern is much cleaner since this is designed to throw an exception and not to actually "clean up" something. –  Toby Mar 7 '11 at 17:00

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