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class A
{
  public: int a,b,c;
};

class B: public A
{
   public: int d;
   B():d(0){} // Some hackery needed here
};

int main()
{
   B obj;
   std::cout<< obj.a << std::endl; // garbage
   std::cout<< obj.b << std::endl; // garbage
   std::cout<< obj.c << std::endl; // garbage
   std::cout<< obj.d << std::endl; // 0
}

How could the subobject data members a,b and c be initialized to 0? I am not permitted to modify class A.

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"I am not permitted to modify class A." Why not? –  Karl Knechtel Mar 7 '11 at 18:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try

B() : A() , d(0){}

A() value initializes A and since A is a POD the members will be default(zero) initialized


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1  
@Prasoon: Some people are just here to downvote without knowing what they are doing, and without leaving even a comment! –  Nawaz Mar 7 '11 at 16:55
1  
@Kristopher and @schnaader : Check out section 8.5/5 ISO C++03 –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 7 '11 at 16:58
2  
OK, I'm now understanding it better. I guess the important passage is this one: "An object whose initializer is an empty set of parentheses, i.e., (), shall be value-initialized" –  schnaader Mar 7 '11 at 17:01
2  
ISTR that this is a change between C++03 and C++0X. And g++ 4.4.4 doesn't set the members to 0. –  AProgrammer Mar 7 '11 at 17:08
1  
your answer didn't work on gnu 4.3.2, by the way. I tested it. –  CashCow Mar 7 '11 at 17:15

I tested this as I thought it might work (even without Prasoon's answer)

B::B() : A(), d(0)
{
}

might work, because you are then "initialising" A.

It didn't, by the way. Output: 1,32,123595988

This would work though:

// put this in B.cpp anonymous namespace
const A a_init = { 0, 0 ,0 };

followed by:

B::B() : A( a_init), d(0)
{
}

I am testing using g++ 4.3.2. Now THIS worked:

B::B() : A(A()), d(0)
{
}
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Try it on compilers which have properly implemented value initialization :) –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 7 '11 at 17:26
    
@Prasoon: Anyway, this is a good answer as it shows there are compilers where this doesn't work. Would be good to know which compiler was used, though. –  schnaader Mar 7 '11 at 18:01
    
@Prasoon My initial reaction was the same solution as yours, although in the practical world, unless you are writing only for your only compiler you write code that works on some old ones too. You could put in a preprocessor, i.e. #if _GNUC_VERSION > 4.5 or whatever –  CashCow Mar 8 '11 at 9:15
    
+1 from me for the last part. –  Prasoon Saurav Mar 8 '11 at 17:25

Perhaps I'm missing something, but how about this?

class B: public A
{
    public: int d;
    B():d(0){a=b=c=0;}
}
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The proper way is of course to have A's constructor initialize it's members. Otherwise, as the members are not private, you can assign them values from inside the B constructor.

a = 0;

etc, actually works.

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declare the derived class constructor as shown below

class B: public A
{
   public: int d;
   B():a(0),b(0),c(0),d(0)
   {

   }

};
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