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Just wondering in case of Asynchronous TCP or other EAP pattern, if the success handler has a reference of this, e.g. this.state, in theory, there is a reference to current instance, as this is kept in some generated object scope by the closure nature. Thus the instance itself should not be garbage collected even the scope which create the instance is finished executing?

My code is similar to following:

 public class ATcpClient
    {
        private ATcpState state = null;

        private void Receive()
        {
            // create the callback here, in order to use in dynamic
            AsyncCallback ReceiveCallback = delegate(IAsyncResult ar)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        // Read data from the remote device.
                        this.state.BytesReceived = this.state.Socket.EndReceive(ar);

                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        // ...

                    }
                };

            try
            {
                    this.state.Socket.BeginReceive(this.state.Buffer, 0, this.state.BufferSize, 0,
                        ReceiveCallback, null);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                // ...
                // ...
            }
        }
}

code which execute it can look like:

public void DoExecuteCode()
{
    new ATcpClient().Receive();
}

Would the instance been GC which cause the Receive() to fail as a whole?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That depends on how clever the compiler is.

In your case, yes, this will definitely be kept alive by the delegate, for as long as the delegate lives.

Let's look at a case that will definitely NOT keep this alive:

    private void Receive()
    {
        ATcpState state = this.state;
        // create the callback here, in order to use in dynamic
        AsyncCallback ReceiveCallback = delegate(IAsyncResult ar)
            {
                try
                {
                    // Read data from the remote device.
                    state.BytesReceived = state.Socket.EndReceive(ar);

                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    // ...

                }
            };

        try
        {
                state.Socket.BeginReceive(state.Buffer, 0, state.BufferSize, 0,
                    ReceiveCallback, null);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            // ...
            // ...
        }
    }

And then a case where compiler optimizations could affect the collection behavior:

    private readonly ATcpState state = new ATcpState();
    private void Receive()
    {
        // create the callback here, in order to use in dynamic
        AsyncCallback ReceiveCallback = delegate(IAsyncResult ar)
            {
                try
                {
                    // Read data from the remote device.
                    state.BytesReceived = state.Socket.EndReceive(ar);

                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    // ...

                }
            };

        try
        {
                state.Socket.BeginReceive(state.Buffer, 0, state.BufferSize, 0,
                    ReceiveCallback, null);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            // ...
            // ...
        }
    }

The only remaining question is, what is the lifetime of that delegate? Is the pending operation a root, or do we just have a circular reference between the delegate, possibly this, state, state.Socket, and the operation? If none of these are reachable from a root then the whole bunch can be finalized (which would close the socket, cancelling the operation).

At least for some objects using the BeginReceive/EndReceive pattern, the operation is NOT a root

It looks like for your case (Socket.BeginReceive), a root is created inside System.Net.Sockets.BaseOverlappedAsyncResult.PinUnmanagedObjects.

share|improve this answer
    
As actually my ATcpClient takes a ATcpState in its constructor and the whole thing is more complex than the simplified code I listed. From your comment, I assume it is safe and compiler would not be that "clever", hopefully. Will do some test tonight... thank you. –  ccppjava Mar 7 '11 at 17:06
    
@ccppjava: You may have read only a portion of my answer, please be sure to look at the update. Just having some reference to an object isn't enough to prevent collection, it has to be reachable from a "GC root" (such as a local variable in a function in the call stack, static member variable, or GCHandle). –  Ben Voigt Mar 7 '11 at 17:09
    
Thank you, have read your update, I think you are right. Although this means a more complex housekeeping thread will be running, but safer. I agree that the whole "maybe circled" reference thing can be GC as a whole. –  ccppjava Mar 7 '11 at 17:13
2  
@ccppjava: I dug into the Socket code and you're ok, a GCHandle is created. –  Ben Voigt Mar 7 '11 at 17:18
    
@Ben, cool, which means I do not need to manage some static dictionary myself and periodly check for resource release :) Will also do some experiment when I finish what I need to do at the moment... ty... –  ccppjava Mar 8 '11 at 10:10
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