Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a javascript associative array say:

var myArray = new Object();
myArray["firstname"] = "Gareth";
myArray["lastname"] = "Simpson";
myArray["age"] = 21;

Is there a built in or accepted best practice way to get the length of this array?

EDIT: JavaScript does not have associative arrays -- it only has objects, which can be used as a notion of associative arrays.

share|improve this question
7  
Object literals in javascript are by default associative arrays eg object.propertyName.propertyValue is the same as object[propertyName][propertyValue] –  neitony Feb 13 '11 at 16:19
3  
Added a one-liner in Underscore.js that does this: stackoverflow.com/a/11346637/11236 –  ripper234 Jul 8 '12 at 10:31
5  
Once line answer is use Object.keys(myArray).length as @aeosynth said. –  K.R.R Jun 22 '13 at 7:50
    
@neitony - that's kinda true, but so many people are used to PHP's "associative array" that they might assume it means "ordered associative map", when JS objects are in fact unordered. –  cloudfeet Jul 23 '13 at 16:53
    
umm in chrome,maybe in more, i can use Object.getLength(obj) not sure where it came from...probably jquery –  Muhammad Umer Aug 10 '13 at 14:36

19 Answers 19

up vote 729 down vote accepted

The most robust answer (i.e. that captures the intent of what you're trying to do while causing the fewest bugs) would be:

Object.size = function(obj) {
    var size = 0, key;
    for (key in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) size++;
    }
    return size;
};

// Get the size of an object
var size = Object.size(myArray);

There's a sort of convention in JavaScript that you don't add things to Object.prototype, because it can break enumerations in various libraries. Adding methods to Object is usually safe, though.

share|improve this answer
3  
awesome concept! –  Greg Miernicki Jan 29 '10 at 2:14
72  
JavaScript was designed to be extended as such. If it breaks something, then whatever is broken should have been written differently. –  Tres Jan 16 '11 at 3:51
21  
@Tres - your code can be broken if someone would come and overide the 'size' property without knowing you declared it already somewhere in the code, so it's always worth checking if it's already defined –  vsync Jun 14 '11 at 11:30
3  
@vsync You are very correct. One should always implement necessary sanity checks :) –  Tres Jun 24 '11 at 2:03
62  
@Tres: Consider that your doppelganger has written Object.size() to be base-1, and has just broken your code. He doesn't care though because you should have written it differently. –  bukzor Jun 25 '11 at 19:32

If you know you don't have to worry about hasOwnProperty checks, you can do this very simply:

Object.keys(myArray).length
share|improve this answer
13  
why not? from what I know, it is a standard: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  vsync Jun 6 '11 at 11:51
81  
It's not a universally implemented method, but you can check which browser supports it with this table. –  aeosynth Jun 6 '11 at 19:08
26  
No IE8 support = no go. –  ripper234 Jan 31 '12 at 10:16
14  
time to switch to firefox = unfortunately, you switching doesn't mean your website's users will... –  cc. Aug 13 '12 at 11:25
17  
@ripper234 no IE support = time to polyfill –  Jan Dvorak Dec 13 '12 at 6:27

Updated: If you're using Underscore.js (recommended, it's lightweight!), then you can just do

_.size({one : 1, two : 2, three : 3});
=> 3

If not, and you don't want to mess around with Object properties for whatever reason, and are already using jQuery, a plugin is equally accessible:

$.assocArraySize = function(obj) {
    // http://stackoverflow.com/a/6700/11236
    var size = 0, key;
    for (key in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) size++;
    }
    return size;
};
share|improve this answer
8  
So simple! I have underscore already in use so this solution was a no-brainer. +1! –  JD Smith Aug 14 '12 at 4:32
2  
_.size() was the perfect solution for my Meteor project, which has underscore.js support. –  tokyovariable Aug 1 '13 at 17:05
1  
I use underscore and this post just reminded me that I'm not using it enough in this project. If you handle objects, you should have underscore.js available. –  jbolanos Nov 20 '13 at 20:51
    
The update about Underscore.js is what got you an upvote from me, my friend :) –  Eduard Luca Jan 21 at 18:04
    
Underscore > (all -['lo-dash']) –  Rayjax Apr 11 at 8:13

I'm not a javascript expert but it looks like you would have to loop through the elements and count them since Object doesn't have a length method:

var element_count = 0;
for (e in myArray) { element_count++; }

@palmsey: In fairness to the OP, the javascript docs actually explicitly refer to using variables of type Object in this manner as "associative arrays".

share|improve this answer
2  
Will not work, because it will count methods too, that are added through prototype. –  Mészáros Lajos Oct 8 '13 at 11:32

Here's the most cross-browser solution.

This is better than the accepted answer because it uses native Object.keys if exists. Thus, it is the fastest for all modern browsers.

if (!Object.keys) {
    Object.keys = function (obj) {
        var arr = [],
            key;
        for (key in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                arr.push(key);
            }
        }
        return arr;
    };
}

Object.keys(obj).length;
share|improve this answer

Here's how and don't forget to check that the property is not on the prototype chain:

var element_count = 0;
for(var e in myArray)
    if(myArray.hasOwnProperty(e))
        element_count++;
share|improve this answer

For some cases it is better to just store the size in a separate variable. Especially, if you're adding to the array by one element in one place and can easily increment the size. It would obviously work much faster if you need to check the size often.

share|improve this answer
    
This is certainly the neatest solution in case. Great idea, thanks! –  Dave Aug 21 at 11:23

To not mess with the prototype or other code, you could build and extend your own object:

function Hash(){
    var length=0;
    this.add = function(key, val){
         if(this[key] == undefined)
         {
           length++;
         }
         this[key]=val;
    }; 
    this.length = function(){
        return length;
    };
}

myArray = new Hash();
myArray.add("lastname", "Simpson");
myArray.add("age", 21);
alert(myArray.length()); // will alert 2

If you always use the add method, the length property will be correct. If you're worried that you or others forget about using it, you could add the property counter which the others have posted to the length method, too.

Of course, you could always overwrite the methods. But even if you do, your code would probably fail noticeably, making it easy to debug. ;)

share|improve this answer

@palmsey: In fairness to the OP, the javascript docs actually explicitly refer to using variables of type Object in this manner as "associative arrays".

And in fairness to @palmsey he was quite correct, they aren't associative arrays, they're definitely objects :) - doing the job of an associative array. But as regards the wider point you definitely seem to have the right of it according to this rather fine article I found:

JavaScript “Associative Arrays” Considered Harmful

But according to all this, isn't the accepted answer itself bad practice?

Specify a prototype size() function for Object

If anything else has been added to Object .prototype, then the suggested code will fail:

<script type="text/javascript">
Object.prototype.size = function () {
  var len = this.length ? --this.length : -1;
    for (var k in this)
      len++;
  return len;
}
Object.prototype.size2 = function () {
  var len = this.length ? --this.length : -1;
    for (var k in this)
      len++;
  return len;
}
var myArray = new Object();
myArray["firstname"] = "Gareth";
myArray["lastname"] = "Simpson";
myArray["age"] = 21;
alert("age is " + myArray["age"]);
alert("length is " + myArray.size());
</script>

I don't think that answer should be the accepted one as it can't be trusted to work if you have any other code running in the same execution context. To do it in a robust fashion surely you would need to define the size method within myArray and check for the type of the members as you iterate through them.

share|improve this answer

Here is a completely different solution that will only work in more modern browsers (IE9+, Chrome, Firefox 4+, Opera 11.60+, Safari 5.1+)

See jsFiddle

Setup your Associative Array class

/**
 * @constructor
 */
AssociativeArray = function () {};

// Make the length property work
Object.defineProperty(AssociativeArray.prototype, "length", {
    get: function () {
        var count = 0;
        for (var key in this) {
            if (this.hasOwnProperty(key))
                count++;
        }
        return count;
    }
});

Now you can use this code as follows...

var a1 = new AssociativeArray();
a1["prop1"] = "test";
a1["prop2"] = 1234;
a1["prop3"] = "something else";
alert("Length of array is " + a1.length);
share|improve this answer

if we have the following hash

hash = {"a" : "b", "c": "d"};

you can get length using length of the keys which is the length of hash

keys(hash).length

share|improve this answer

If you are using jquery just go with .length method.

$(object).length will give you length of passed object

share|improve this answer
    
This will return always 1, being the unique element your associative array. –  falmp Sep 1 at 14:48

What about something like this --

function keyValuePairs() {
    this.length = 0;
    function add(key, value) { this[key] = value; this.length++; }
    function remove(key) { if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) { delete this[key]; this.length--; }}
}
share|improve this answer
    
you and i are on the same page Dan... –  Jerry Aug 24 '11 at 14:30

a variation on some of the above

var objLength = function(obj){    
    var key,len=0;
    for(key in obj){
        len += Number( obj.hasOwnProperty(key) );
    }
    return len;
};

a bit more elegant way to integrate hasOwnProp

share|improve this answer

Below is a version of James Coglan's answer in CoffeeScript for those who have abandoned straight JavaScript :)

Object.size = (obj) ->
  size = 0
  size++ for key of obj when obj.hasOwnProperty key
  size
share|improve this answer
    
You probably wanted to say size++ for own key of obj (own key being syntax sugar in CoffeeScript). Using hasOwnProperty directly from the object is dangerous, as it breaks when object actually has such property. –  xfix Sep 1 '13 at 10:47

Here's a different version of James Cogan's answer. Instead of passing an argument, just prototype out the Object class and make the code cleaner.

Object.prototype.size = function () {
    var size = 0,
        key;
    for (key in this) {
        if (this.hasOwnProperty(key)) size++;
    }
    return size;
};

var x = {
    one: 1,
    two: 2,
    three: 3
};

x.size() === 3;

jsfiddle example: http://jsfiddle.net/qar4j/1/

share|improve this answer
3  
Object.prototype - bad idea. –  tborychowski Oct 14 '13 at 10:50
    
@tborychowski can you please explain why? –  Mohamad Mar 5 at 13:09
    
here's one article: bit.ly/1droWrG. I'm not saying it mustn't be done, only that you need to know all the repercussions before you do this. –  tborychowski Mar 5 at 15:55
    
+1 because I dont have to give each object as a parameter in this solution, I just have to call it as myObj.size() –  Steel Brain Aug 27 at 11:23

It's not really an associative array (edit: IMHO, docs apparently say otherwise). You're basically doing this

myArray.firstname = "Gareth";

So I don't think you can get the length. You might try using something like Prototype's hash.

share|improve this answer

Like most, JavaScript problems there are many solutions. You could extend the Object that for better or worst works like many other languages' Dictionary (+ first class citizens). Nothing wrong with that, but another option is to construct a new Object that meets your specific needs.

function uberject(obj){
    this._count = 0;
    for(var param in obj){
        this[param] = obj[param];
        this._count++;
    }
}

uberject.prototype.getLength = function(){
    return this._count;
};

var foo = new uberject({bar:123,baz:456});
alert(foo.getLength());
share|improve this answer

This method gets all your object keys in array, so you can get length of that array is equls to your objects keys length.

Object.getOwnPropertyNames({"hi":"Hi","msg":"Message"}).length

share|improve this answer

protected by VisioN Apr 4 '13 at 17:18

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.