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Continuing to learn WCF, I'm trying to write a small program that would with a click of a button take the work from texbox1 , pass it to ServiceContract and get back its length.

Here's how far I got.

Form1.cs:

...
wcfLib.Service myService = new wcfLib.Service();

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    textBox2.Text = Convert.ToString( myService.go(textBox1.Text) );
}

...

and the wcf file:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Runtime.Serialization;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.Text;

namespace wcfLib
{

    [ServiceContract]
    public interface IfaceService
    {
        [OperationContract]
        int wordLen(string word);
    }



    public class StockService : IfaceService
    {
        public int wordLen(string word)
        {
            return word.Length;
        }
    }





    public class Service
    {
        public int go( string wordin )
        {

            ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(StockService), new Uri("http://localhost:8000/wcfLib"));
            serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(IfaceService), new BasicHttpBinding(), "");

            serviceHost.Open();

            int ret = **///// HOW SHOULD I PASS wordin TO StockService to get word.Length in return?**

            serviceHost.Close();

            return ret;
        }
    }


}

what I can't figure out right now, is how do I pass the wordin variable above into the ServiceContract?

share|improve this question
    
Do you understand what is WCF supposed to do? In you Go method you hosted the service but in same method you want to be a client of that service. Why? If you want to learn WCF create two processed and communication between them. This doesn't make sense you can simply create instance of StockService directly and call wordLen without hosting it in WCF. –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 7 '11 at 17:57
    
>>> Do you understand what is WCF supposed to do? Truly, not very much. :( I do understand what is a ServiceContract and how it can access sort of a function from the interface. Yet I currently can't figure out how to split this two into different apps that would be passing data to one another... –  Rob Mar 7 '11 at 18:06
    
Try to go through this tutorial: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms734712.aspx –  Ladislav Mrnka Mar 7 '11 at 18:55
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to create the client in your form and call wordLen() directly... only a class that inherits from IfaceService can be called as a WCF service. So:

//  You'll have to create references to your WCF service in the project itself...
//  Right-click your form project and pick 'Add Service Reference', picking 
//  'Discover', which should pick up the service from the service project... else
//  enter http://localhost:8000/wcfLib and hit 'Go'.
//  You'll have to enter a namespace, e.g. 'MyWcfService'... that namespace is
//  used to refer to the generated client, as follows:
MyWcfService.wcfLibClient client = new MyWcfService.wcfLibClient();

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
    // You really shouldn't have the client as a member-level variable...
    textBox2.Text = Convert.ToString(client.wordLen(textBox1.Text));
}

If your Service class is meant to host the WCF Service, it needs to be its own executable and running... put the code you have in go() in Main()

Or host your WCF Service in IIS... much easier!


Edit

IIS = Internet Information Services... basically hosting the WCF Service over the web.

To host in IIS, create a new project, "WCF Service Application". You'll get a web.config and a default interface and .svc file. Rename these, or add new items, WCF Service, to the project. You'll have to read up a bit on deploying to IIS if you go that route, but for debugging in Visual Studio, this works well.

To split into two applications, just make the form its own project... the service reference is set through the application's config file; you just point it to the address of the machine or website, e.g. http://myintranet.mycompany.com:8000/wcflib or http://myserver:8000/wcflib.

Thanks for the vote!

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks! :) got it working! :) By the way, what is IIS? :) –  Rob Mar 7 '11 at 19:47
    
and one more question, what do I do to split it into two applications that run on different machines? –  Rob Mar 7 '11 at 19:54
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You've definitely got things back-to-front. You don't want to create the ServiceHost in your Go method, or at least, you'd never create it in any method invoked by the client, because how could the client call it if the service hasn't been created yet?

A service in WCF is started, and THEN you can invoke its methods from a remote client. EG, this is your Main() for the service:

ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost(typeof(StockService), new Uri("http://localhost:8000/wcfLib"));
serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(IfaceService), new BasicHttpBinding(), "");
serviceHost.Open();
Console.WriteLine("Press return to terminate the service");
Console.ReadLine();
serviceHost.Close();

Then for your client you'd use "Add Service Reference" in Visual Studio (right-click on the Project in Solution Explorer to find this menu option) and enter the address for the service. Visual Studio will create a proxy for your service, and this is what you'd instantiate and use on the client. EG:

MyServiceClient client = new MyServiceClient();

textBox2.Text = Convert.ToString( client.wordLen(textBox1.Text) );
share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks! :) got it working! :) –  Rob Mar 7 '11 at 19:47
    
and one more question, what do I do to split it into two applications that run on different machines? –  Rob Mar 7 '11 at 19:56
    
The service contract and its implementation must go in a different project/assembly. Then you'd install each on separate machines. The client project would not have the ServiceContract or implementation in its References--it would rely entirely on the code generated for the proxy by Visual Studio. –  C. Lawrence Wenham Mar 7 '11 at 19:59
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