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Edited because I'm a moron. Should have said class originally.

I have the code that does something like this:

file1.py

class A(object):
  def __init__(self):
    stuff_here()

class B(object):
  def func(self):
    self.a = A()

file2.py

import file1
class A(file1.A):
  def __init__(self):
    file1.A(self)
    self.thing = other_thing

class B(file1.B):
  pass

I would like that when I instantiate file2.B() it uses file2.A() for its member a, not file1.A()

Is there a way to do this? I tried looking at the python scoping rules but I'm misunderstanding it I think.

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3  
Maybe Object should be class. –  Sven Marnach Mar 7 '11 at 17:49
3  
Could you be a little more concrete about what you're trying to build? Then maybe we can contribute alternative suggestions. –  Thomas Mar 7 '11 at 17:51
    
I am extending a system that already has some classes that have quite a lot of code in them. I need to change 1 tiny implementation detail of class A, as the original class makes a assumption that doesn't hold true for my data. –  PGM Mar 7 '11 at 18:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use a class attribute to hold the class you would like to use. In the first file, use

class B(object):
    A = A
    def func(self):
        self.a = self.A()

and in the second file, use

class B(file1.B):
    A = A

Probably there is a better way of achieving whatever you want to achieve...

Edit: Your comment to your question suggests that you don't want to actually change the code in the first file. In this case, you could try to "monkey patch" file1.py. Write file2.py as

import file1

class A(file1.A):
    def __init__(self):
        file1.A(self)
        self.thing = other_thing

file1.A = A

Now you actually substituted file1.A by your own version. This is certainly hacky, but sometimes the quickest way to get somewhere.

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+1 but with reservations. While it should do what the OP is asking for, I can't help but feel whatever OP's really trying to accomplish could be better done some other way. –  Davy8 Mar 7 '11 at 17:57
    
This certainly worked, but it does feel like a hack. I can at least move on until I figure out something more elegant. Much thanks. –  PGM Mar 7 '11 at 18:20

Define a method in the parent that returns the class to use, and override it in the child.

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