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I get this error "import java.util.scanner never used". I'm not sure what I need to insert.

import java.util.Scanner;


public class Diamond {
     public static void diamondOfAsterisks() {

            for (int i = 1; i < 10; i += 2) {
              for (int j = 0; j < 9 - i / 2; j++)
                System.out.print(" ");

              for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
                System.out.print("*");

              System.out.print("\n");
            }

            for (int i = 7; i > 0; i -= 2) {
              for (int j = 0; j < 9 - i / 2; j++)
                System.out.print(" ");

              for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
                System.out.print("*");

              System.out.print("\n");
            }
          }
        }
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Delete the import line as it is not needed. Nowhere in the code are you using that type.

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Thanks, that helped. –  Mike Mar 7 '11 at 20:32

Just remove the following import statement from your program.

import java.util.Scanner
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That's just a warning, because you never use "java.util.Scanner"

Just remove "import java.util.Scanner;" and it should stop to complain.

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That's not an error. Most likely a warning in your IDE that suggest you to remove this unused import.

In java you may have as many unused imports as you want, it doesn't impact the performance at all. But it is recommended to have only those you need, so your program is maintainable.

So, to fix this, just delete that line.

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Actually at least in Eclipse you can specify that unused imports can be handled like errors. –  Voo Mar 7 '11 at 18:38
    
The compiler may need some microseconds longer with the statements in, though. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 7 '11 at 19:22
    
@Paŭlo I meant, runtime performance, not compilation performance, but yes. @Voo Good point, they are not hoewever Java errors. –  OscarRyz Mar 7 '11 at 19:34

All the other answers are saying "Delete the Scanner import statment".

My question is... why was it in there in the first place?

The purpose of the warning is to say "You have this import, but you're not using it. Did you mean to use this, and just forgot to add it?"

I see those warnings as a quasi-to-do-list for my class. Most of the time it happens when I add something, remove it because it needs to be refactored, and haven't put it back in yet. So my guess is you had a Scanner in there, it wasn't working right, you took Scanner out, but the import was left.

Chances are if you imported it once, you'll need to use it somewhere. Before you go deleting it, remember why it was there.

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