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Is there any widely used SQL coding standard out there? SQL is little bit different from C/C++ type of programming languages. Really don't know how to best format it for readability.

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You could use a tool like SQLinForm (www.sqlinform.com) for automatic formatting which stores your favorite formatting options in profiles and allows them to share with your team. –  Guido Aug 24 at 17:56

13 Answers 13

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Wouldn't call it coding standard - more like coding style

SELECT
    T1.col1,
    T1.col2,
    T2.col3
FROM
    table1 T1
    INNER JOIN ON Table2 T2 ON T1.ID = T2.ID
WHERE
    T1.col1 = 'xxx'
    AND T2.Col3 = 'yyy'
  • capitalize reserved words
  • main keywords on new line
  • can't get used to commas before columns
  • always use short meaningful table aliases
  • prefix views with v
  • prefix stored procs with sp (however don't use "sp_" which is reserved for built in procs)
  • don't prefix tables
  • table names singular
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1  
Just make sure you don't put an underscore after the "sp": sqlmag.com/Articles/ArticleID/23011/23011.html?Ad=1. I'm sure you already know this... that's mainly directed towards others who might tweak your style. –  Tadmas Feb 6 '09 at 22:39
    
Yup - thanks - added warning –  DJ. Feb 6 '09 at 22:45
2  
Personally I prefer not to prefix object names. I think it reads much easier and clearer without prefixes and when I'm using an object I should already know what type of object it is (as should anyone reading my code). –  Tom H. Feb 7 '09 at 0:51
    
hi for more details of SQL Coding Standard go throw .. selectinsql.blogspot.in/2012/08/… –  vijay Aug 29 '12 at 7:25

If you google, there are plenty of coding standards out there. For example,

Database Coding Standard and Guideline

and

SQL SERVER Database Coding Standards and Guidelines Complete List

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Google brought me here... –  Kevin Wiskia Aug 26 at 20:15

I like the comma preceding way:

SELECT
      column1
    , column2
    , column3
    , COALESCE(column4,'foo') column4
FROM
    tablename
WHERE
    column1 = 'bar'
ORDER BY 
      column1
    , column2

it makes it the easiest to read and debug in my opinion.

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6  
I find that style irritating, but it is personal preference, I guess. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 6 '09 at 22:12
1  
This also lets you comment single lines without having to worry about commas. –  Domchi Feb 6 '09 at 23:33
8  
Unless you need to comment the first line. Doing it with commas at the end lets you comment any line too, except for the last line. It's the same thing. –  Tom H. Feb 7 '09 at 0:48
6  
The bigger difference you notice with comma preceding is that if youre missing a comma, its obvious. It stands out. –  Ryan Guill Feb 15 '13 at 20:18

I know this is long, but bear with me, it's important. This question opened a cool can of worms. And if you don't like database blocks, read on.

And, before anyone thinks about knocking down my response, please see the following article and connected articles to it about locking, and recompiles; two of the most damaging resources hits on a SQL database.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/263889

I can type pretty quickly, and I don't like to type any more than the next person. But the points below I follow extremely closely, even if it is more typing. So much that I've built my own SP apps to do it for me.

The points I bring up are really important! You might even say to yourself, "are you kidding, that's not an issue", well, then you didn't read the articles above. AND, it's totally moronic that M$ would put these points in as NOTEs. These issues to me should be BOLD and SCREAMING.

I also do a lot of coding to build my basic scripts using C# applications to speed up development and these practices are very sound (10 years worth) to make scripting SPs easier and especially faster.

There are more than this, but this is what I do for the first 60% of everything.


Best practices

  • Use the brackets around objects, so the query engine excplicitly knows a field when it sees it
  • Use THE SAME CASE as table object names and field names
  • When calling SPs from application, use the fully qualified [dbo].[procName] with correct owner AND case. Not Kidding! Read the articles above!
  • Reference the owner of the object so security is explicitly known and doesn't have to be figured out
  • DON'T us "sp_" as this refers to system stored procs, and overhead
  • Use SET NOCOUNT ON and SET NOCOUNT OFF to eliminate the extra overhead to keep track of how many records are updated in the stored proc unless you need them. Normally, you don't and you can gain a huge increase in performance.

Preferences

  • Prefix stored procs with proc
  • Suffix every stored proc with SEL, UPD, DEL, INS (or SELECT, UPDATE, DELETE, INSERT)
  • Capitalize reserved words
  • Main keywords on new line (scripting)
  • Use commas before columns (scripting)
  • Prefix views with vw
  • Don't prefix tables
  • Table names singular
  • Add a suffix to the standard names like "_ByPK", "_OrderByLastName", or "_Top15Orders" for variations on the stock SP


Select

CREATE PROC [dbo].[procTable_SEL]
AS
SET NOCOUNT ON
SELECT
    [Column1] = T1.[col1]
  , [Column2] = T1.[col2]
  , [Column3] = T2.[col3]
FROM [dbo].[Table] T1    
INNER JOIN ON [dbo].[Table2] T2 ON T1.ID = T2.ID
WHERE
      T1.[col1] = 'xxx'
  AND T2.[Col3] = 'yyy'
SET NOCOUNT OFF
GO


Update

CREATE PROC [dbo].[procTable_UPD]
AS
SET NOCOUNT ON
UPDATE t1 SET
    [Column1] = @Value1
  , [Column2] = @Value2
  , [Column3] = @Value3
FROM [dbo].[Table1] T1
INNER JOIN ON [dbo].[Table2] T2 ON T1.[ID] = T2.[ID]
WHERE
      T1.[col1] = 'xxx'
  AND T2.[Col3] = 'yyy'
SET NOCOUNT OFF
GO


Insert

CREATE PROC [dbo].[procTable_INS]
AS
SET NOCOUNT ON
INSERT INTO [Table1] (
[Column1]
  , [Column2]
  , [Column3]
)
VALUES (
    @Value1
  , @Value2
  , @Value3
)
SET NOCOUNT OFF
GO

OR

CREATE PROC dbo.procTable_INS
AS
SET NOCOUNT ON
INSERT INTO [table1] (
    [Column1]
  , [Column2]
  , [Column3]
)
SELECT
    [Column1] = T1.col1
  , [Column2] = T1.col2
  , [Column3] = T2.col3
FROM dbo.Table1 T1    
INNER JOIN ON Table2 T2 ON T1.ID = T2.ID
WHERE
      T1.[col1] = 'xxx'
  AND T2.[Col3] = 'yyy'
SET NOCOUNT OFF
GO


Delete

CREATE PROC dbo.procTable_DEL
AS
SET NOCOUNT ON
DELETE
FROM [dbo].[Table1] T1
INNER JOIN ON [dbo].[Table2] T2 ON T1.[ID] = T2.[ID]
WHERE
      T1.[col1] = 'xxx'
  AND T2.[Col3] = 'yyy'
SET NOCOUNT OFF
GO
share|improve this answer

From a really very nice blog on PostgreSQL, but this topic is applicable in general:

Maintainable queries - my point of view (depesz.com)

...I decided that my priorities for writing maintainable queries:

  1. Avoid useless typing.

  2. Use aliases for tables/views. Always. And make them sensible aliases.

  3. Indent code in some way.

  4. Avoid quotations (yes, this is why I hate Django)

  5. Use join syntax

I do agree with capitalization of reserved words and every other identifier, except my own.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 overall, although I find that many people take #1 way too far. I much prefer a few extra keystrokes if it means making my code more readable. For example, studies have shown that underscores (vs. camel-notation) improves readability drastically, but everyone complains about those few extra keys. –  Tom H. Feb 7 '09 at 0:53
    
Right. Underscores are a great way to improve readability with identifiers, but, as always, is matter of balance. –  Alex. S. Feb 7 '09 at 3:56
    
Agree with everything except aliases. SqlServer 2008 has Intellisense now and I'd rather not make a mistake on a JOIN clause because someone had a Lookup AS L1 and 14 of those making have to hunt for what L12 is. I would prefer somethinglike: Lookup AS Lookup_Foo. –  Nazadus Jun 9 '09 at 21:47

I personally don't like to prefix a stored procedure name with sp_ - it is redundant, IMO. Instead, I like to prefix them with a "unit of functionality" identifier. e.g. I'll call the sprocs to deal with orders order_Save, order_GetById, order_GetByCustomer, etc. It keeps them all logically grouped in management studio and makes it harder to pick the wrong one. (GetOrderByProduct, GetCustomerById, etc...)

Of course, it is personal preference, other people may prefer to have all the Get sprocs together, all the Save ones, etc.

Just my 2c.

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1  
Using "sp_" as a prefix is possible, but actually is against database coding standards because its used to declare the stored procedure as a system stored procedure and thus has extra overhead. –  SnapJag Feb 6 '09 at 22:23
    
My point about the prefixes was that sp_ or usp_ or whatever is redundant, since I already know that these are sprocs. I don't call tables tab_Orders, for example, so why do it with sprocs? –  ZombieSheep Feb 7 '09 at 9:07

Google for sql pretty printer or look here. I haven't tried it out myself, but it gives you a good start. Most commercial tools like Toad have a "formatting" option which helps, too.

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I generally keep very little per line, ie:

select
    col1,
    col2,
    col3
from
    some_table tabl1
where
    col1 = 'some'
and 
(
    col2 = 'condition'
or  col2 = 'other'
)
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Play around with www.sqlinform.com - I recommend using the ANSI-92 standard, and then pretty it up with that site.

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SELECT c.id
     , c.name
     , c.folder
     , cs.num_users active_members
     , cs.num_videos

  FROM campaign c
  JOIN campaign_stats cs
    ON cs.campaign_id = c.id
  JOIN (SELECT _c.id
             , _c.name

          FROM campaign _c
    	 WHERE _c.type = 9) t_c 
    ON t_c.id = c.id

 WHERE c.id IN (1,2,3)
   AND cs.num_videos > 10

This works pretty good for us.

This actual query doesn't make much sense since I tried to build it quickly as an example... but that's not the point.

  • t_c stands for category table sub-query or "temp category".
  • _underscoring of stuff inside sub-queries.
  • alias column names to make sense in the context of the query. e.g. "active_members"
  • putting commas at the beginning of the new lines makes it easier to build dynamic queries:

    $sql .= ", c.another_column"
    
  • everything else is straightforward.

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Anything in blue is upper case SELECT, DELETE, GO, etc

Table names are singular like the table that holds our customers would be the customer table

Linking tables are tablename_to_tablename

use _ between works in table names and parameters

example

BEGIN
  SELECT
  Company.ID AS Company_ID,
  Company.Client_Name,
  Company.Website,
  Office.Office_Name
 FROM
  Company_Office WITH(NOLOCK)
  INNER JOIN Company WITH(NOLOCK) ON Company_Office.Company_ID = Company.ID
 WHERE
END

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create table
    #tempTable (
        col1 int,
        col2 int,
        col3 int
    )

insert into
    #tempTable (
        col1,
        col2,
        col3
    )
    select
        col1,
        col2,
        col3
    from
        Table3
        inner join Table2
            on Table1.col1 = Table2.col2
    where col1 = 5

select
    col2,
    case when col1 = 3
        then 'something'
        else 'somethingelse'
    end
from #tempTable
where
    col1 = 5
    and (
        col2 = 5
        or col3 in (
            select field
            from Table2
            where
                somecol = 2
                and othercol = 5
        )
    )
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I'm surprised that the coding style I've used for almost 20 years isn't on this list:

  SELECT column1,
         column2,
         column3,
         COALESCE(column4, 'foo') AS column4
    FROM tablename
   WHERE column1 = 'bar'
ORDER BY column1,
         column2

I find this the absolutely most readable, but I admit that it is tedious to type. If right aligning the keywords is too much, I'd opt for left aligning them:

SELECT   column1,
         column2,
         column3,
         COALESCE(column4, 'foo') AS column4
FROM     tablename
WHERE    column1 = 'bar'
ORDER BY column1,
         column2
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't that the same as stackoverflow.com/a/522565/470014 ? –  Caltor Sep 26 '13 at 10:32
    
Almost. I don't agree with the placement of the commas and prefer making aliases more explicit by always using AS, though. –  mzedeler Oct 1 '13 at 19:51
1  
Oh yeah. Agreed on both counts. Preceding commas are soooooo ugly! –  Caltor Oct 2 '13 at 22:39
    
Don't like this at all. How do handle indenting for sub-queries, or complicated stored procedures? –  user2444499 Apr 3 at 4:29
    
Feel free to provide a query, and I'll add a formatted version above. But yes, it is very complicated to use this indentation style. I just think it looks better and is the most readable. –  mzedeler Apr 7 at 9:13

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