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I have a String that looks like

"Hello my is Joeseph. It is very nice to meet you. What a wonderful day it is!". 

I want to count the number of times "is" is in the string.

How can i do this in Java?

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closed as off-topic by Raedwald, Beryllium, Roman C, karthikr, zsong Sep 5 '13 at 20:19

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2  
Could you post what you've tried yourself? And what about: "Is miss bliss?" –  Bart Kiers Mar 7 '11 at 18:54
    
@Bart Kiers then Im sure we could just look for " is " instead of "is" to avoid that ;) –  Joeseph Mar 7 '11 at 19:23
1  
"you don't understand what it is." –  asgs Mar 7 '11 at 19:24
    
By looking for " is ", you'll miss: " is," and "is!" etc. –  Bart Kiers Mar 7 '11 at 19:24
    
@asgs, :) ` ` ` ` –  Bart Kiers Mar 7 '11 at 19:24

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int index = input.indexOf("is");
int count = 0;
while (index != -1) {
    count++;
    input = input.substring(index + 1);
    index = input.indexOf("is");
}
System.out.println("No of *is* in the input is : " + count);
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@jzd agreed, thanks for pointing out the mistake. –  asgs Mar 7 '11 at 19:01
    
@asgs, I have removed my down vote. Thanks for the fix. –  jzd Mar 7 '11 at 19:02
1  
@asgs, you can't undelete comments and because you edited your answer within the first five minutes there is not revision history. So there is nothing to learn. –  jzd Mar 7 '11 at 19:09
1  
You could also use index = input.indexOf("is", index+1) instead of substring and then indexOf. W/o profiling, I don't know for sure, but suspect this will be quicker. It's also 1 line less of code ;) –  Mikezx6r Mar 7 '11 at 19:26
1  
Many false positives like "miss", "bliss". It also misses the capitalized "Is", "IS" or "iS". So although the OP has accepted the answer, a -1 from me. –  Bart Kiers Mar 7 '11 at 19:28
String haystack = "Hello my is Joeseph. It is very nice to meet you. What a wonderful day it is!";
haystack.toLowerCase();
String needle = "is";

int numNeedles = 0;

int pos = haystack.indexOf(needle);

    while(pos >= 0 ){

      pos = pos + 1;
      numNeedles = numNeedles + 1;

      pos = haystack.indexOf(needle,pos);

    }

 System.out.println("the num of " +needle+ "= " +numNeedles);
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Since when is a variable of the char type able to hold multiple characters? –  LuigiEdlCarno Sep 5 '13 at 6:22
    
Noted my mistake and edited –  Betsy Sep 6 '13 at 8:25
import java.io.*;
class chello
{
    public static void main(String args[])throws IOException
    {
String s,w="";
char c;
int l,cou=0,i;
BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
System.out.println( "Enter the String:" );
s=br.readLine();
s=s.concat(" ");
l=s.length();
for(i=0;i<l;i++)
{

c=s.charAt(i);

if (c!=' ')
{
w=w+c;
}
else if (w.equalsIgnoreCase("is"))
{
cou++;
w="";
}
else
    w="";
}
System.out.print(cou);
}
}
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Dude really...? –  notfed Aug 21 at 14:53

If you prefer regex, here is a regex solution:

String example = "Hello my is Joeseph. It is very nice to meet you. isWhat a wonderful day it is!";
Matcher m = Pattern.compile("\\bis\\b").matcher(example);

int matches = 0;
while(m.find())
    matches++;

System.out.println(matches);

In this case the "is" in "isWhat" is ignored, because of the \b boundary matcher in the pattern

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You can find the code here. It strangely looks like the Robby's one.

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split on every " " (blank) and check the outcoming string[] with a loop

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What if there was a space in the string he wanted to check for? –  Daniel DiPaolo Mar 7 '11 at 19:15
    
In that case he wouldn't count the number of "is" in the string >_< , but if so, he could use a regex. –  nyyrikki Mar 7 '11 at 19:27
String s = "a.b.c.d";
String replace = ".";

int count = s.replaceAll("[^" + replace + "]", "").length() / replace.length();
println(count);
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An easy way is using Apache StringUtils.countMatches

http://commons.apache.org/lang/api-release/org/apache/commons/lang/StringUtils.html

StringUtils.countMatches("Hello my is Joeseph. It is very nice to meet you. What a wonderful day it is!", "is");
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Simple and sweet. Upvote. –  Sid Mar 7 '11 at 18:56
1  
or with Spring Framework StringUtils.countOccurrencesOf(string, "is"); –  stivlo Sep 12 '11 at 21:11
    
Aren’t Spring StringUtils meant primarily for use within the framework? Meaning, it works, but Apache’s clearly better in this respect. –  Michael Piefel Sep 2 '13 at 19:49
    
Works nicely. Thanks. –  Andrew Sep 25 at 14:59

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