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I had a class assignment (it's already past) where I had to write a Sudoku solver. I was able to create a method that can solve for each missing number. But I'm having trouble creating a method to find which cells I need to solve. I'm supposed to take a 2D array and fill in the missing number (represented by 0's). I've put some of my code below, but not all of it (even though the assignment has passed, I respect the profs wishes).

public class SolveSudoku {

    private static int[][] grid = new int[9][9];

    public static int[][] getSolution(int[][] grid) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
            System.arraycopy(grid[i], 0, SolveSudoku.grid[i], 0, 9);
        }
        int n = getZero();
        return getSolution(n);
    }

    private static int[][] getSolution(int n) {
        if (n == 0) {
            return grid;
        }
        Cell cell = getZero();
        int row = cell.row;
        int column = cell.column;
        for (int number = 1; number <= 9; number++) {
            //checks cell using another method
            //I have booleans that return true if the number works
        }
        return null;
    }

    private static int getZero() {
        return 0;
    }

    private static class Cell {
        int cell = 0;
        int row = 0;
        int column = 0;
        int number;
    }
}

I have the getZero method which has to find each zero in the grid (0's represent a missing number) so I can solve it. What should I do in getZero to find the cells I need to replace?

share|improve this question
    
+1 for openness. –  Matt Ball Mar 7 '11 at 19:21
1  
The assignment is over, but I would still like to know what I need to do. Thanks! –  John Mar 7 '11 at 19:23
4  
getZeroes is expected to return both a Cell and an int, according to your code, and is actually called getZero. You should first make up your mind about your interface. –  Xr. Mar 7 '11 at 19:28
    
getZero should return an int, but I use cell inside of zeroes. –  John Mar 7 '11 at 19:59
    
Unfortunately the result of getZero() is driven by what your solver algorithm needs - all 0-cells? the 'first' 0-cell? the number of 0-cells? I think you need to step back and describe/think about the solver itself first. Btw, it is a bad idea to name a method argument n - it is unclear what it is supposed to represent. –  Lars Mar 7 '11 at 20:02

3 Answers 3

You don't check if the number is repeated in the same 3x3 square (only rows and columns).

I don't get what do you mean by "finding zeroes". In fact it is meaningless, solving the sudoku from the first row or the last one has no effect in the solution. I'll explain what did I do for the same trouble.

  1. A cell is not an int, is an object. In the object I store a value (the number if it is found, 0 if not) and a boolean[9]. False means (index + 1) is discarded because it is in the same row/column/square, true means it is not decided yet. Also, 3 Lists (Vectors, Sets, whatever).
  2. A list of 81 cells (you can make it a bidimensional array if you wish).
  3. 9 Lists/Vectors/Sets representing rows, 9 representing columns, 9 representing square. Each of the 81 cells is assigned to its row/column/square. Inside each cell you store the references to the list to which it belongs to.
  4. Now comes the execution part. In a first iteration, every time you find a non-zero (a number fixed in the sudoku), you loop through the lists to which the cell belongs. For each cell in those lists, you mark the boolean assigned to that number to false.
  5. You loop through cells, each time you find a 0 you check how many of the booleans in the cell are true. If it is 1 (all other 8 possible values have been discarded), it is the value of the cell. You set it, and as in 4) you get the list to which it belongs and mark that number to false in every cells. Loop until you get a solution, or an iteration in which you cannot set any number (no solution available directly, must start with backtracking or similar).

Remember before getting at the keyboard, to have a clear idea about what the question is and how would you resolve it without a computer. If you do not know what you want to do, the computer won't help (unless you post in stackoverflow)-

share|improve this answer

From what I can tell you want to find the first 0-valued cell in grid. I'll define first as the first zero containing column in the lowest zero-containing row.

This can be done using a naive search:

private Cell getZeroCell(){
    int rz = -1;
    int cz = -1;
    outer: for(int row = 0; row < grid.length; row++){
        for(int col = 0; col < grid[row].length; col++){
            if(grid[row][col] == 0){
               rz = row;
               cz = col;
               break outer;
            }
        }
    }
    if(rz == -1 || cz == -1){
       // no zeros found
       return null;
    }else{
       // first zero found at row `rz` and column `cz`
       Cell cell = new Cell();
       cell.row = rz;
       cell.column = cz;
       return cell;
    }
}

Get the "number" of the first cell containing a zero (counting left to right, then top to bottom, 0-indexed):

private int getZeroInt(){
    int rz = -1;
    int cz = -1;
    outer: for(int row = 0; row < grid.length; row++){
        for(int col = 0; col < grid[row].length; col++){
            if(grid[row][col] == 0){
               rz = row;
               cz = col;
               break outer;
            }
        }
    }
    if(rz == -1 || cz == -1){
       // no zeros found
       return -1;
    }else{
       return rz * grid[0].length + cz;
    }
}

Get the number of cells containing a zero:

private int getNumZeros(){
    int count = 0;
    for(int row = 0; row < grid.length; row++){
        for(int col = 0; col < grid[row].length; col++){
            if(grid[row][col] == 0){
              count++;
            }
        }
    }
    return count;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems close to what I need. But how would this work with an int instead of a cell? –  John Mar 7 '11 at 22:43
    
@John: what do you want the int to represent? –  Mark Elliot Mar 7 '11 at 22:53
    
@John: on a whim, here's two more functions, one that gets an indexed cell (row * 9 + col); and one that counts the number of cells containing zeros. –  Mark Elliot Mar 7 '11 at 23:01

I'm posting this as an answer, because of the length limit in the comments. If you want to skip all the fun and check how a f. genious solved the problem, go here

Some time ago I tried to build a sudoku solver to practice how to do TDD. And I found that a good data structure to represent the problem was to have a 9x9 grid of cell objects (just to print the numbers), and then auxiliary arrays which represented the the columns, rows and areas, in this way the algorithms to solve the sudoku, only needed an array as a parameter.

Another thing I found was that the Cell object could be implemented as List of "shadow numbers", those are numbers that can go in that cell. So when a Cell has only one number in the shado array, it's solved. And, for example, when a number is solved, it's removed from all the cells in the associated row, column and area.

I know that this is not really useful as an answer, but it was a great experience to try TDD on a problem that cannot be really solved by "just coding".

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