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I have the following static class (simplified for the sake of clarity) used in a asp.net mvc application

public static class GObjContextHelper
{
  private static readonly object _lock = new object();

  public static GObjContext GetObjContext()
  {
    Trace.TraceInformation("_lock: " + _lock);

    //lock (_lock)
    //{
    //Trace.TraceInformation("exclusive section");
    //}
    return null;
  }
  ....
}

It works perfectly fine unless the lock block is uncommented. At that moment _lock field stops being initialized - _lock is null which can be verified with debugger or TraceInformation. In fact both the inline and initialization using static constructor for any field stops working once lock block is present. What makes it even stranger, this happens only within this particular class. I was unable to reproduce it in any other static class within the application.

I have a feeling that I missing something embarrassingly trivial here.

[EDIT]

It turns out (and I should have provided a more complete example in the first place..) one of the field variables was referencing GObjContextHelper.GetObjContext() internally. After fixing this circular reference everything works as expected.

I still would appreciate an explanation on what happens during initialization of a static class where field variable is an object which references the aforementioned static class in its constructor. And why lock statement has such effect on variables initialization order.

a more detailed example:

public static class GObjContextHelper
{
    private static TestService testService = new TestService();
    private static readonly object _lock = new object();

    public static GObjContext GetObjContext()
    {
        Trace.TraceInformation("_lock: " + _lock);         

        // _lock is properly initialized if this lock block is commented out.
        // otherwise _lock is null
        //lock (_lock)
        //{
        //}
        return null;
      }
    public static object Account { get { return testService.GetCurrentAccount(); } }
}


public class TestService
{
    GObjContext context;

    public AccountService()
    {
        context = GObjContextHelper.GetObjContext();
    }

    public object GetCurrentAccount()
    {
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
I think static field initialization order in C# is nondeterministic, so this may be the issue. –  driushkin Mar 7 '11 at 19:45
    
I dunno. That isolated snippet works for me in VS2010. –  Ritch Melton Mar 7 '11 at 21:15
    
When/where do you call GetObjContext? From another static field? ie. private static GObjContext = GetObjContext(); ? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 7 '11 at 21:27
    
Is GObjContextHelper a partial class? And is the GetObjContext method used in the static field initializer in another source file? –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 7 '11 at 21:28
    
I have updated the question. Sorry for not providing a more detailed example previously. –  orom Mar 7 '11 at 21:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can definitely stop worrying about this by doing something like:

public static class GObjContextHelper
{
  private static object _lock;

  public static GObjContext GetObjContext()
  {
    Trace.TraceInformation("_lock: " + _lock);

    lock (GetLockObject())
    {
      Trace.TraceInformation("exclusive section");
    }
    return null;
  }

  private static object GetLockObject()
  {
    if (_lock == null)
    {
      _lock = new object();
    }

    return _lock;
  }
  ....
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is not thread safe though –  m0sa Mar 7 '11 at 21:21
    
@m0sa: Thread-safety can be gained, if it is needed. –  Jon Mar 7 '11 at 21:28
    
you have a typo in your sample, you should be locking on the returned object not the method group –  m0sa Mar 7 '11 at 21:33
    
@m0sa: Fixed. Thank you. –  Jon Mar 7 '11 at 21:33
    
I have updated the question. Sorry for not providing a more detailed example previously. –  orom Mar 7 '11 at 21:36

You will need to have a static constructor if you want deterministic initialization of static fields:

public static class GObjContextHelper
{
  private static readonly object _lock;
  static GObjContextHelper() 
  {
    _lock = new object();
  }
}

You can also force field initialization just by specifying the static constructor. This tells the c# compiler that your type is not to be marked with the beforefieldinit CIL property.

public static class GObjContextHelper
{
  private static readonly object _lock = new object();
  static GObjContextHelper() 
  {
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have updated the question. Sorry for not providing a more detailed example previously. –  orom Mar 7 '11 at 21:36

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