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The following code adds the numbers from 1 to 100 and returns the sum. What I'm trying to do is run the calculations in a backgroundworker and return a value. The problem with this is that returnValue is returned before DoWork completes. How can I have it wait for my background worker to complete before returning a value? (I can't seem to put the return in my DoWork...)

double returnValue = 0;

var b = new BackgroundWorker();
b.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(
    delegate(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) {
        for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
            returnValue += (i+1);
        }
    }
);

b.RunWorkerAsync();
return returnValue;

Addendum: Would it be better to send a message pump on the same thread instead of running this on a background worker?

Also, this is just example code, my actual code takes more than a minute to complete.

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Almost the same question as stackoverflow.com/questions/939635/… –  Doc Brown Mar 7 '11 at 19:37
    
Possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/5182782/… –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 7 '11 at 19:37
1  
What you're asking to do doesn't make sense; you're trying to execute code on the BackgroundWorker, but you also want to block the calling method from returning until the BackgroundWorker is done. –  Adam Robinson Mar 7 '11 at 19:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Subscribe to the RunWorkerCompleted event. That event contains the return value of the background operation.

Of course, that value would be returned from inside the DoWorkEventHandler, like so:

b.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(
    delegate(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) {
        double returnValue = 0;
        for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
            returnValue += (i+1);
        }
        return returnValue;
    }
);
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Yes this works well. I also like that the return value can be an object or struct. –  mtone Mar 7 '11 at 19:41

I don't really see a question here, but what I think you are looking for is the event called RunWorkerCompleted. That gets raised when the DoWork delegate completes. If this is not what you are looking for, I think you need to rephrase your question.

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i have postet a sample: here maybe it can help you :-)

Also, this is just example code, my actual code takes more than a minute to complete.

this can be the effect of the async start. you can tell the backgroundworker when to start or just say start. if you don´t explicit say that he should start NOW he starts when c# thinks it is a good time to start :-)

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You are trying to do a synchronous operation with BackgroundWorker which it BAD. But if you must, you could use the IsBusy flag.

double returnValue = 0;

var b = new BackgroundWorker();
b.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(
    delegate(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) {
        for(int i=0;i<100;i++){
            returnValue += (i+1);
        }
    }
);

b.RunWorkerAsync();
while(b.IsBusy){
  Application.DoEvents();
}
return returnValue;
share|improve this answer
1  
This kinda defeats the purpose of the BackgroundWorker. –  Bryan Mar 7 '11 at 19:36
    
@Bryan exactly. but if he has to wait for the BackgroundWorker to finish then why use BackgroundWorker ? –  Bala R Mar 7 '11 at 19:37
    
Would a message pump be better? –  sooprise Mar 7 '11 at 19:40
    
@sooprise like Application.DoEvents(); ? sure –  Bala R Mar 7 '11 at 19:44
    
Calling Application.DoEvents is almost always a bad idea. msdn tries to make this clear but does not, imho, put sufficient emphasis on how bad an idea it is. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Adam Straughan Mar 7 '11 at 19:54

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