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Crockford's book, JavaScript: The Good Parts, says (on page 114) that constructor functions should always be given names with an initial capital letter (ie. Point), and that function names with initial capital letters should only be used with constructor functions (everything else should be lowerCase).

This convention helps us avoid forgetting to use the new operator with constructor functions.

He goes on to say that "[a]n even better coping strategy is to not use new at all."

My question is, how do we program JavaScript without using new at all?

  • We can avoid new Object() and new Array() with the literal {} and [].
  • We can avoid new Number(), new Boolean(), and new String() with 0, true and ''.
  • We can avoid new RegExp() with something like /pattern/.

How do we avoid new Date()?

And, most importantly, how do we avoid using new with our own custom Objects?

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Prototyping, prototyping, prototyping. –  Oded Mar 7 '11 at 19:36
    
What argument does he have? I have a complete project relying on new for a great deal and it has helped alot in organising it. –  pimvdb Mar 7 '11 at 19:38
2  
2  
I can't for the life of me see why you would want to dismiss such a construct, seemingly at the whim of ones own laziness or to compensate for ones forgetfulness. Intriguing, nonetheless. –  Grant Thomas Mar 7 '11 at 19:45
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8 Answers

Crockford gives an example for an object creation function as should have been provided by JS itself in one of his Javascript talks available on http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/

However, the YUI(3) team itself uses "new", and they DO follow his recommendations (since he's the Yahoo chief JS architect (UPDATE: he moved on, but the statement was true when this response was originally written). I understand this particular statement to be more on an "academic" level, what SHOULD have been HAD the language been designed "right" and not with some leftovers of the class-based inheritance stuff. He (IMHO rightly) says that the way it turned out JS is conflicted, prototype based but with this one thing from "classical class" inheritance languages.

However, JS is as it is so go and use "new".

You can find his object creation function here: http://javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html

 if (typeof Object.create !== 'function') {
     Object.create = function (o) {
         function F() {}
         F.prototype = o;
         return new F();
     };
 }
 newObject = Object.create(oldObject);

EDIT: Updated to use Crockford's latest version of that function - there are three.

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Not using new and blindly following Crockford is silly.

Understand JavaScript and write good code. Using the new keyword is the Cornerstone of JavaScript OO.

You are going to miss out on a lot of good JavaScript code by avoiding new.

Rather than arbitrarily cutting huge chunks out of your toolkit, learn it and use it properly instead.

Crockford has a habit of saying that anything in JavaScript which ever gave him a bug in his code is bad.

I would personally go on to say that "[a]n even better coping strategy is to be competent."

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8  
I wouldn't say that new is the Cornerstone of JavaScript OO. –  Sean McMillan Apr 5 '11 at 3:34
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@Raynos: I beg to differ; while {} and new Object() have the same result (a new empty object) they exactly in the fact that {} does not use the new keyword. If you have es5's Object.create(), then the only time you will need new is for Date and Error (in core JS. You will also need it for browser types, but rarely.) You can write substantial, well organized javascript without using new. –  Sean McMillan Apr 8 '11 at 14:15
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@Raynos: Oh sure, absolutely. Concern over new in javascript is all about the lack of ability to tell if a function requires new or not, and the danger of running a constructor over the global object if you forget the new. Poor new gets blamed for the brokenness of this on global functions. –  Sean McMillan Apr 8 '11 at 14:53
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Erm... you misspelled "competent" :) –  FredOverflow Jul 3 '11 at 14:41
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@SeanMcMillan so two months later I agree, new is horrid, use Object.create :) –  Raynos Jul 3 '11 at 14:45
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I don't know how to avoid new Date() or new XMLHttpRequest() either. But I do know how to avoid using new for my own types.

First, I start with Object.create(). This is an ES5 method, so it's not available everywhere. I add it using the es5-shim, ad then I'm ready to go.

I like the module pattern, so I start by wrapping my type in a self-executing anonymous function, var Xyz = (function() {...})(). This means I have a private space to work without making a mess in the global namespace. I return an object with a create() function, and a prototype property. the create() function is for users of my type. When they want one, they call Xyz.create(), and get back a new, initialized object of my type. The prototype property is available if people want to inherit.

Here's an example:

var Vehicle = (function(){
        var exports = {};
        exports.prototype = {};
        exports.prototype.init = function() {
                this.mph = 5;
        };
        exports.prototype.go = function() {
                console.log("Going " + this.mph.toString() + " mph.");
        };

        exports.create = function() {
                var ret = Object.create(exports.prototype);
                ret.init();
                return ret;
        };

        return exports;
})();

and inheritance looks like this:

var Car = (function () {
        var exports = {};
        exports.prototype = Object.create(Vehicle.prototype);
        exports.prototype.init = function() {
                Vehicle.prototype.init.apply(this, arguments);
                this.wheels = 4;
        };

        exports.create = function() {
                var ret = Object.create(exports.prototype);
                ret.init();
                return ret;
        };

        return exports; 

})();
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You can avoid new by creating factory functions:

var today = Date.getToday();

(In case you were wondering, you can't avoid it on the factory function itself:)

Date.getToday = function() { return new Date(); };

Although I only think you should create such functions if it adds semantic value (as in the case above) or if you can default some of the constructor parameters. In other words, don't do it just to avoid using new.

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I think he means that one would do: Date.prototype.getToday = function() { ... } –  Pointy Mar 7 '11 at 19:43
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While that is true it is not what Douglas Crockford meant to say, and this question is about just that. See javascript.crockford.com/prototypal.html –  Mörre Mar 7 '11 at 19:45
    
@Pointy: No, he meant what he wrote. The point is to be able to write Date.getToday() instead of new Date(). If he declared the function on the prototype, he would have to write new Date().getToday(), thus defeating the point of the exercise. –  KaptajnKold Mar 13 '11 at 14:44
    
Oh OK, I see what you guys are doing now. Thanks for the clarification (not that it wasn't clear originally; I was just confused). –  Pointy Mar 13 '11 at 15:47
    
Especially provide factories for your own types. even if you have to use new, don't make your clients use it. –  Sean McMillan Apr 8 '11 at 14:17
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This question has already been asked and answered: Is JavaScript 's "new" Keyword Considered Harmful?

As Raynos said, blindly following Crockford (or anyone else for that matter) without understanding why they say the things they do, is silly.

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Very good point, because in that context Crockford talks about JS's history and in a larger context of where it comes from, and how it SHOULD have been. Since we ended up with JS as it IS we use "new". –  Mörre Mar 7 '11 at 19:56
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I think his advice of not using new at all is conceptual (academic) and not to be taken literally. The Date class is a perfect exception to the rule because how else can you get a current (or arbitrary) date object using standard ECMAScript?

However, regarding not using new with your own custom objects you can use a few strategies. One is to use factory-like methods instead of constructors which could take as an argument an object instance to "bless" into your new type, or use a new object literal by default. Consider the following:

var newCar = function(o) {
  o = o || {};
  // Add methods and properties to "o"...
  return o;
}
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function F() { return { /* your fields and methods here */ } }
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You can avoid "new" by returning an anonymous object and using a closure in your constructor. This also help you hide private data.

Consider:

function SomeCounter(start) {

    var counter = start;

    return {
        getCounter : function() {
            return counter;
        },

        increaseCounter : function() {
            counter++;
        }

    };
}

Now to use this, all you need to do is

var myCounter = SomeCounter(5);
myCounter.increaseCounter();
console.log(myCounter.getCounter()); //should log 6

The beauty of this is that you do not need to remember to use "new", but if you do it won't hurt you.

var myCounter = new SomeCounter(5); //still works
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While this is true, I would be very upset if you are calling functions with new that don't need it. And making all of your methods into closures means that you require storage for each method on every instance of your type. –  Sean McMillan Apr 5 '11 at 3:39
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