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When inserting 50,49,48 into an AVL Tree, it prints out.

The root is: 50 
50 Level: 0 Height: 0

 49 Level: 1 Height: 0
50 Level: 0 Height: -1

50 Level: 0 Height: 0 -->> Rotation did not work?

Here are my functions. Rotate Left:

void AVLTree::rotateLeft(AVLNode* node)
{   
    AVLNode* otherNode = node;


    otherNode = node->leftchild;
    node->leftchild = otherNode->rightchild;
    otherNode->rightchild = node;

    node->height = max( height(node->leftchild), height(node->rightchild)) +1;
    otherNode->height = max( height(otherNode->leftchild) , height(otherNode->rightchild))+1;
    node = otherNode;

}

insert:

AVLTree::AVLNode* AVLTree::insert(int d,AVLNode *n){
if (n == NULL)
{
    n = new AVLNode;
    n->data = d;
    n->leftchild = NULL;
    n->rightchild = NULL;
    n->height = 0;

} else if( d < n->data) {

    n->leftchild = insert(d,n->leftchild);

    if (height(n->leftchild) - height(n->rightchild) == 2) {
        if (d < n->leftchild->data) {
            rotateLeft(n);
        } else {
            rotateLeftTwice(n);
        }
    }

} else if (d > n->data) {

    n->rightchild = insert(d,n->rightchild);

    if (height(n->rightchild) - height(n->leftchild) == 2) {
        if (d > n->rightchild->data) {
            rotateRight(n);
        } else {
            rotateRightTwice(n);
        }
    }
} else {    
    ;
}
n->height = max(height(n->leftchild), height(n->rightchild))+1;
return n;}
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1  
Balancing AVL trees as a student is the programming task I remember as being the hardest I ever had to do in my life, and people with a poor grasp of undecidability results think that what I do nowadays is impossible. Perhaps it's like the snow that seems higher in childhood memories; anyway, I wish you good luck (no, I won't look at it again) –  Pascal Cuoq Mar 7 '11 at 20:23
    
As a note for future readers...the rotateLeft function above is actually a rotateRight. –  runfaj Feb 23 '14 at 23:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The node parameter to your rotateLeft function is a local variable in rotateLeft. In other words, when you assign a value to that variable in rotateLeft, the n variable in insert is not modified. You need to pass n to rotateLeft either through a pointer or through a reference, i.e. either

void AVLTree::rotateLeft(AVLNode** node)

or

void AVLTree::rotateLeft(AVLNode*& node)

The same principle applies to insert's n parameter - if you want a function to modify the value of a variable, you need to pass it a pointer or reference to that variable rather than its value.

share|improve this answer
    
I've made the changes and the same happened. The variables are changing the overall code because it would be the same as commenting out the rotate left code. Which is not the case. –  Everton Mar 7 '11 at 21:18
    
Have you tried the classic "run the code with pencil on paper" method? It's very effective with trees. –  molbdnilo Mar 7 '11 at 22:01
    
Yes I have. If I comment out the rotations it works fine as a binary tree. The algorithm to make the rotations seems to be working ok on paper. –  Everton Mar 7 '11 at 22:13
    
You were right, I made a bad implementation of your correction. turns out I needed to change the insertion as well. Thanks a lot! –  Everton Mar 7 '11 at 22:34

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