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How do I return null value from a generic method?

protected T ValueOrDefault<T>(IDataReader reader, int ordinalId)
        {  
  Type t = typeof(reader.GetValue(ordinalId));
    if (t.IsValueType){
        //Struct. How do I return null?
    } else { 
        //Class
        //just return  null
        return  default(T);
    }
}
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Can we see the whole method (at least include the signature). –  RQDQ Mar 7 '11 at 20:21
    
I've edited my question. –  Alexandre Mar 7 '11 at 20:23
    
On a side note, 'typeof' will not work as you've written it. You'll need to use GetType() and possibly check that GetValue has not returned null. –  Dan Bryant Mar 7 '11 at 20:28
    
Trying to alter the return signature of a method at runtime would tear a hole in the universe. –  RQDQ Mar 7 '11 at 20:33
    
BTW - do you anticipate getting reference types from your reader? –  RQDQ Mar 7 '11 at 20:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

default(T) works in both cases.

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I have to return Nullable<> if T is value type, but not default(T). –  Alexandre Mar 7 '11 at 20:19
2  
@Alex, if you return Nullable<T>, then you're violating the contract of the method, which is supposed to return type T. If T is already an int?, however, then the default(T) will work. –  Dan Bryant Mar 7 '11 at 20:26

default(T) does function in both cases, but its meaning is slightly different for value types. It literally returns the default value of the type. In the case of Method<int>, it will return 0, not null.

UPDATE: Given your method signature:

protected T ValueOrDefault<T>(IDataReader reader, int ordinalId)

You can't return Nullable<T> in the case of a value type and type T in the case of a reference type. That would have to be two different methods.

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Obviously you can only return null if the return type is either Nullable<T> or a reference type. Normal value-types have no null.

For reference types default(T) is null, and for Nullable<T> it's null too. So you can use default(T) in both cases where null exists.

If the type is another value-type default(T) will not be null, but since there is no null that wouldn't make sense anyways.


It is not possible to simply have a method that has return type T if T is a reference-type/Nullable<T> and T? for normal value types.

One could try to define something like this, but it won't compile because the compiler doesn't understand that the generic constraints are mutually exclusive. It just doesn't consider generic constraints for that.

T? a<T>()
  where T:struct
{
}

T a<T>()
  where T:class
{
}

You need to make these methods different in some other way. Either by using different names or different parameters.

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If you want to return T? if it's a value type, you have to use two separate methods. However, there is a complexity, in that methods can't differ only by their return type (there's also issues around the generic args not being part of a method signature). So you have to provide a 'stub' method parameter which the compiler uses to resolve which method to call:

public T MyMethod<T>(T stub) where T : class {
    // ...
    return null;
}

public T? MyMethod<T>(T? stub) where T : struct {
    // ...
    return null;
}

// this will then compile...
string s = MyMethod<string>(null);
int? i = MyMethod<int>(null);
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Two methods is no good. –  Alexandre Mar 7 '11 at 20:36
    
Why not? The overload resolution algorithm will choose the correct one at runtime. Any duplicated code can be put in a third method called by the other two that returns a boolean indicating if null should be returned. What you want to do is not possible in the current C# language. –  thecoop Mar 7 '11 at 20:37

It's not legal to return null for an unconstrained T value. Consider for instance if T is instantiated as a value type. In that case null would not be a legal value and hence the code is illegal.

What you're looking for is default(T). This will work for both value and reference types. For reference types it will produce null and for value types it will produce the zero initialized value.

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To see why this isn't possible, try replacing T with a value type:

protected int ValueOrDefault<int>(IDataReader reader, int ordinalId)
        {  
  Type t = typeof(reader.GetValue(ordinalId));
    if (t.IsValueType){
        //Struct. How do I return null?
    } else { 
        //Class
        //just return  null
        return  default(int);
    }
}

If the return type is int, you can't return null because it's not a valid value. The type of T would have to be nullable in the first place, in which case default(T) works.

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