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I have this script:

for(var i=1; i<=2; i++){
    setTimeout(function() { alert(i) }, 100);
}

But the alert message is just two times '3' (i seems to be a reference). I want the alert to be 1 and 2...

Is there a way to pass the i, without writing the function as a string?

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Possible dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/3448195/… –  stefan Mar 7 '11 at 23:03
1  
possible duplicate of Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example –  rds Feb 1 '13 at 9:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 69 down vote accepted

You have to arrange for a distinct copy of "i" to be present for each of the timeout functions.

function doSetTimeout(i) {
  setTimeout(function() { alert(i); }, 100);
}

for (var i = 1; i <= 2; ++i)
  doSetTimeout(i);

If you don't do something like this (and there are other variations on this same idea), then each of the timer handler functions will share the same variable "i". When the loop is finished, what's the value of "i"? It's 3! By using an intermediating function, a copy of the value of the variable is made. Since the timeout handler is created in the context of that copy, it has its own private "i" to use.

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2  
This is the preferred method as it does not cause a function definition inside the body of the loop. The others will work, but are not preferable (even if they do show the amazing bad-assness of JS ;) ). –  JAAulde Mar 7 '11 at 23:03
1  
@JAAulde I confess that I personally would do it with an anonymous function, but this way is nicer as an example. –  Pointy Mar 7 '11 at 23:05
    
Function definitions are hoisted to the top of their scope, so the anonymous function version ends up looking like this anyway. –  harto Mar 7 '11 at 23:09
2  
@harto function definition statements are hoisted, but not function expressions. (At least, I think that's true ...) –  Pointy Mar 7 '11 at 23:23
    
Ah, you're correct. –  harto Mar 9 '11 at 2:38

This look like a more simple way , minimal deviation from the question

for(var i=1; i<=2; i++){
    setTimeout(function(j) { alert(j) }, 100,i);
}

You can use the third argument of setTimeout to pass arguments to the anonymous function.

Note: This doesn't work on IE9 and below browsers.

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Perhaps this is what you wanted:

for (var i = 1; i <= 2; i++) {
    setTimeout(function(j) { alert(j) }, 1000*i, i);
}
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ANSWER?

I'm using it for an animation for adding items to a cart - a cart icon floats to the cart area from the product "add" button, when clicked:

function addCartItem(opts) {
    for (var i=0; i<opts.qty; i++) {
        setTimeout(function() {
            console.log('ADDED ONE!');
        }, 1000*i);
    }
};

NOTE the duration is in unit times n epocs.

So starting at the the click moment, the animations start epoc (of EACH animation) is the product of each one-second-unit multiplied by the number of items.

epoc: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epoch_(reference_date)

Hope this helps!

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1  
You can also pass args into the callback function like: setTimeout(function(arg){...}, 1000*i, 'myArg'); –  Cody Mar 24 at 7:32

The function argument to setTimeout is closing over the loop variable. The loop finishes before the first timeout and displays the current value of i, which is 3.

Because JavaScript variables only have function scope, the solution is to pass the loop variable to a function that sets the timeout. You can declare and call such a function like this:

for (var i = 1; i <= 2; i++) {
    (function (x) {
        setTimeout(function () { alert(x); }, 100);
    })(i);
}
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Try this:

for(var i = 1; i <= 2; i++) {
    (function(index) {
        setTimeout(function() { alert(index); }, 100);
    })(i);
}

And a live demo.

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2  
Nice real-world example of the benefits of using a self-invoking function. –  Oli B Mar 20 '13 at 12:45
    
@Darin Dimitrov This is not working for me. The script waiits for the timeout initially and then executes the whole for loop at once. Can you plz help. –  Parag Gangil Jun 18 at 6:07

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