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I'm trying to write a function to analyze game trees. The trees are represented by nested lists where each sub-list represents a branch. Basically, there are two things I want to figure out:

  1. what is the minimax value of a nested list?
  2. what is the index of that value?

I thought I had mostly solved the first problem, but my code keeps returning the wrong values--I've checked everything over and can't see what I've done wrong.

Any help would be much appreciated, thanks!

;MINIMAX*
(define minimax*
  (lambda (l operation hilo)
    (cond
      ((null? l) hilo)
      ((equal? operation 'max)
       (cond
         ((null? (cdr l)) (if
                           (list? (car l))
                           (minimax* (car l) 'min hilo)
                           (if
                            (> (car l) hilo)
                            (car l)
                            hilo)))
         (else (if
                (list? (car l))
                (if
                 (> (minimax* (car l) 'min hilo) hilo)
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'max (minimax* (car l) 'min hilo))
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'max hilo))
                (if
                 (> (car l) hilo)
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'max (car l))
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'max hilo))))))
      ((equal? operation 'min)
       (cond
         ((null? (cdr l)) (if
                           (list? (car l))
                           (minimax* (car l) 'max hilo)
                           (if
                            (< (car l) hilo)
                            (car l)
                            hilo)))
         (else (if
                (list? (car l))
                (if
                 (< (minimax* (car l) 'max hilo) hilo)
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'min (minimax* (car l) 'max hilo))
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'min hilo))
                (if
                 (< (car l) hilo)
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'min (car l))
                 (minimax* (cdr l) 'min hilo))))))
      (else (error "Invalid operation type, must be 'max or 'min")))))
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3  
One thing you can do first is simplify the code. There are argmin and argmax functions in Racket that return the minimum and maximum elements of a list, and so you don't need to write those yourself. There are also min and max for direct use as functions. If you are doing the minimax algorithm rather than alpha-beta pruning, you can just write a function using recursive map operations that will be much simpler. –  Jeremiah Willcock Mar 8 '11 at 2:22
    
or take another datastructure, like records. –  Sebastian Aug 3 '11 at 14:07
    
It would be helpful if you posted an example of some inputs and your expected output values. –  soegaard Oct 22 '11 at 13:07

1 Answer 1

You should change your approach a little bit. Instead of programming one fundamental procedure that makes the everything, you can implement some utility procedures.

For the minimax procedure it does not matter if the data comes in a tree or a list. So you can write yourself a procedure that converters your tree into a list like this one

 (define (fringe t)
   (cond ((null? t) t)
     ((pair? (car t)) (append (fringe (car t)) 
                      (fringe (cdr t))))
     (else (cons (car t) (fringe (cdr t))))))

Checking for minimum or maximum is basically an iteration over a list or tree. So you could do that with fold. See http://www.gnu.org/software/mit-scheme/documentation/mit-scheme-ref/Reduction-of-Lists.html

So you can write your procedure like this:

(define (minimax op t)
  (let ((flat-list (fringe t)))
    (fold op (car t) (cdr t))))

For further reading Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. It is a great book for learning Scheme and programing in general.

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