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I apologize for the basic question but my newness to Java is causing me some frustration and I am unable to find an elegant way to do this from my searches.

I want to iterate through a linked list using a For construct but also have an numerical iterator so that I can break the loop after a certain number of iterations.

I have this LL that I am iterating through:

LinkedList<SearchResult> docSearch;

I tried doing it like this but then only the iterator part worked (the result was always stuck on the first entry for each iteration)

for (SearchResult result : docSearch) while (iter2 < 50)  { 

//do stuff
iter2 = iter2 + 1;
}

Any advice is appreciated

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what exactly do you want? looping through all elements, but break after a certain number of iterations? What if there are less than that "certain number" of elements in the list? –  RAY Mar 8 '11 at 3:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have to do that sort of checking, then I would just do it with an if in the block.

for (SearchResult result : docSearch)  {
  if (iter2 >= 50) break;

  //do stuff
  iter2 += 1;
}
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ah ok thanks (think you meant to leave out the while part ?), I had used a similar method of doing this before in Python but was unaware I could do this in Java.. thanks –  Rick Mar 8 '11 at 3:06
    
I guess you will edit that while (iter2 < 50) in the first line away :) –  user unknown Mar 8 '11 at 3:11
    
Yes, that was a copy-and-paste fail. I did mean to leave out the while part. –  Paul Elliott Mar 8 '11 at 3:13
    
cool, thanks that was a big help though –  Rick Mar 8 '11 at 3:16

It will be better to use regular for..loop syntax to handle your need

for (int i = 0; i < 50 && i < docSearch.getSize(); i++ ) {
    SearchResult result = docSearch.get(i);
}

Just because Java support for-each loop, does not mean we have to use it every time. I find using regular for..loop syntax is easier to read where your condition is isolated in 1 place. If you use for-each with break then you have 2 places which affect your code flow.

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For a linked list you should not use indexed access, though - your loop has O(n^2) run time (with n = 50), an iterator-based variant has only O(n). (It might not matter for n = 50, but it will matter for larger sizes.) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 8 '11 at 14:13

where did you assign the value of iter2?

try

for (SearchResult result : docSearch) 
{
  int iter2 = 0;
  while (iter2 < 50)  { 

  //do stuff
  iter2 = iter2 + 1;
  }
}
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for (SearchResult result : docSearch)  {
  if (iter2++ >= 50) break;
  //do stuff
}

Here might be a nice place for a post-incrementation too. :)

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If you do this:

for (SearchResult result : docSearch) while (iter2 < 50)  { 

//do stuff
iter2 = iter2 + 1;
}

It's the exact same as doing this:

for (SearchResult result : docSearch) {

    while (iter2 < 50)  { 

    //do stuff
    iter2 = iter2 + 1;
    }
}

You can get around this in a number of ways. One is a break (although some frown upon this as spaghetti code.

for (SearchResult result : docSearch) { 
if(iter2 >= 50) break;
//do stuff
iter2 = iter2 + 1;
}

You can use a standard for loop and put the two conditions into the condition section

Iterator<SearchResult> iter = docSearch.iterator();
for(SearchResult result = iter.next(); iter.hasNext() && iter2 < 50; result = iter.next()) {
   // do stuff
   iter2 = iter2 + 1;
}
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