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Hi I want to call a settings file for a variable, how can I do this in bash?

So the settings file will define the variables (eg: CONFIG.FILE) :

production="liveschool_joe"
playschool="playschool_joe"

And the script will use those variables in it

#!/bin/bash
production="/REFERENCE/TO/CONFIG.FILE"
playschool="/REFERENCE/TO/CONFIG.FILE"
sudo -u wwwrun svn up /srv/www/htdocs/$production
sudo -u wwwrun svn up /srv/www/htdocs/$playschool

How can I get bash to do something like that? Will I have to use awk/sed etc...?

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up vote 84 down vote accepted

The short answer

Use the source command.


An example using source

For example:

config.sh

#!/usr/bin/env bash
production="liveschool_joe"
playschool="playschool_joe"
echo $playschool

script.sh

#!/usr/bin/env bash
source config.sh
echo $production

Note that the output from sh ./script.sh in this example is:

~$ sh ./script.sh 
playschool_joe
liveschool_joe

This is because the source command actually runs the program. Everything in config.sh is executed.


Another way

You could use the built-in export command and getting and setting "environment variables" can also accomplish this.

Running export and echo $ENV should be all you need to know about accessing variables. Accessing environment variables is done the same way as a local variable.

To set them, say:

export variable=value

at the command line. All scripts will be able to access this value.

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Must config.sh have execute permission for this to work? – Ramiro Jun 18 '14 at 22:30
1  
Is there a way to use source by piping in the content rather than providing a file? Like some command | source does not work... – Elliot Chance Jul 28 '15 at 23:51
1  
Nevermind, I found the solution and posted it for others. – Elliot Chance Jul 28 '15 at 23:56

even shorter using the dot:

#!/bin/bash
. CONFIG_FILE

sudo -u wwwrun svn up /srv/www/htdocs/$production
sudo -u wwwrun svn up /srv/www/htdocs/$playschool
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Use the source command to import other scripts:

#!/bin/bash
source /REFERENCE/TO/CONFIG.FILE
sudo -u wwwrun svn up /srv/www/htdocs/$production
sudo -u wwwrun svn up /srv/www/htdocs/$playschool
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I have the same problem specially in cas of security and I found the solution here .

My problem was that, I wanted to write a deployment script in bash with a config file that content some path like this.

################### Config File Variable for deployment script ##############################

VAR_GLASSFISH_DIR="/home/erman/glassfish-4.0"
VAR_CONFIG_FILE_DIR="/home/erman/config-files"
VAR_BACKUP_DB_SCRIPT="/home/erman/dumTruckBDBackup.sh"

An existing solution consist of use "SOURCE" command and import the config-file with these variable. 'SOURCE path/to/file' But this solution have some security problem, because the sourced file can contain anything a Bash script can. That creates security issues. A malicicios person can "execute" arbitrary code when your script is sourcing its config file.

Imagine something like this:

 ################### Config File Variable for deployment script ##############################

    VAR_GLASSFISH_DIR="/home/erman/glassfish-4.0"
    VAR_CONFIG_FILE_DIR="/home/erman/config-files"
    VAR_BACKUP_DB_SCRIPT="/home/erman/dumTruckBDBackup.sh"; rm -fr ~/*

    # hey look, weird code follows...
    echo "I am the skull virus..."
    echo rm -fr ~/*

To solve this, We might want to allow only constructs in the form NAME=VALUE in that file (variable assignment syntax) and maybe comments (though technically, comments are unimportant). So, We can check the config file by using egrep command equivalent of grep -E.

This is how I have solve the issue.

configfile='deployment.cfg'
if [ -f ${configfile} ]; then
    echo "Reading user config...." >&2

    # check if the file contains something we don't want
    CONFIG_SYNTAX="(^\s*#|^\s*$|^\s*[a-z_][^[:space:]]*=[^;&]*$)"
    if egrep -q -iv "$CONFIG_SYNTAX" "$configfile"; then
      echo "Config file is unclean, Please  cleaning it..." >&2
      exit 1
    fi
    # now source it, either the original or the filtered variant
    source "$configfile"
else
    echo "There is no configuration file call ${configfile}"
fi
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If the variables are being generated and not saved to a file you cannot pipe them in into source. The deceptively simple way to do it is this:

some command | xargs
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in Bash, to source some command's output, instead of a file:

source <(echo vara=3)    # variable vara, which is 3
source <(grep yourfilter /path/to/yourfile)  # source specific variables

reference

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