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I often want to do

context "empty stack" do
  SOME_CONSTANT = "value"
  it "should be empty" do
    # use SOME_CONSTANT
  end
end

context "populated stack" do
  SOME_CONSTANT = "a different value"
  it "should have some items" do
    # use SOME_CONSTANT
  end
end

ruby doesn't scope constants to closures so they leak out. Does anyone have a trick for declaring constants that are scoped to a context?

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up vote 14 down vote accepted

Change the declaration of the constant:
from SOME_CONSTANT = "value"
to self::SOME_CONSTANT = "value"

RSpec creates an anonymous class for each set of specs (context in your example) that it comes across. Declaring a constant without self:: in an anonymous class makes it available in global scope, and is visible to all the specs. Changing the constant declaration to self:: ensures that it is visible only within the anonymous class.

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Interesting -- thanks. – zetetic May 17 '11 at 6:34
    
Perfect! Thanks – opsb May 22 '11 at 20:26
    
Didn't work for me inside Capybara's features. – Nakilon Oct 15 '15 at 10:56

Having used rspec for longer now I think the more idiomatic approach is to use let.

context "empty stack" do
  let(:some_constant){ "value" }

  it "should be empty" do
    puts some_constant
  end
end

context "populated stack" do
  let(:some_constant){ "a different value" }

  it "should have some items" do
    puts some_constant
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
I totally recommend using the let constructs. Read more about let here: relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-core/docs/helper-methods/let-and-let – Nicolas Feb 18 '14 at 16:32
    
I want to use let but it's not available in the before blocks. – 23inhouse Apr 4 at 7:50

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