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i have a class Product that contains a Dictionary with a price curve. The key is a string that can be parsed to a TimeStamp.

public class Product
{
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual IDictionary<string, decimal> PriceList { get; set; }

    public Product()
    {
        this.PriceList = new Dictionary<string, decimal>();
    }
}

Now i need a second class with more prices for each key

public class SpecialProduct : Product
{
    public enum PriceType
    {
        BusineesDays,
        Weekends,
        Holidays
    }

    public virtual IDictionary<string, IDictionary<PriceType, decimal>> PriceList { get; set; }

    public SpecialProduct()
    {
        this.PriceList = new Dictionary<string, IDictionary<PriceType, decimal>>();
    }
}

I am not sure if this is a good approach for this case. I would also like to constrain the enum type to decimal. Any ideas?

UPDATE: I forgot to mention that i need to save all products i a generic List (List)

share|improve this question
    
you don't need to create second dictionary field in derived class, please explain more why you need "constrain the enum type to decimal"? – Arsen Mkrtchyan Mar 8 '11 at 8:55
    
i am working in finance therefore decimal – mrt181 Mar 8 '11 at 18:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is hiding a member.

Polymorphism means changing method, property implementation in some subclass, say it "derived" or "inherited" class. But, anyway, it's signature is immutable.

C# provides a good way of hiding members: the "new" keyword.

You just need to put "new" before access modifier in the derived class and you got it. If you don't do that, C# compiler will suggest you to do that.

By the way, if your goal is using polymorphism, you should take generics in account.

Your base class should have a "TPriceValue" generic parameter and it'll look like this:

public class Product<TPriceValue>
{
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual TPriceValue PriceList { get; set; }

    public Product()
    {
        // NOTE/EDIT: You wouldn't initialize "PriceList" here...
    }
}

So, if you want your price value to be a decimal, you should instantiate your class this way:

new Product<decimal>();

Or, if you want that your value as another dictionary:

new Product<IDictionary<PriceType, decimal>>();

If I'm not wrong, this is the way to go in your case ;)

EDIT: Sorry I forgot to change something in your base class, check again this answer :)

share|improve this answer
    
The assignment in the Product constructor does not compile: Cannot convert source type 'System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<string,decimal>' to target type 'TPrice'. I forgot to mention, that i would also like to save these products in another generic List – mrt181 Mar 8 '11 at 16:31
    
Well, in fact, it was a "typo" leave that constructor with this assignment. I just edited to remove it. Why? Since TPrice is a generic type, why you would set "PriceList" with a dictionary? You must do it when you create the instance of "Product", because, what happens if "TPriceValue" is a decimal and you want to set a dictionary? :) – Matías Fidemraizer Mar 9 '11 at 7:49
    
I already guessed so. How do i then pass such an object to a method. How do i add Product<decimal> and Product<IDictionary<PriceType, decimal>> to a IList<Product<GenericType>>??? – mrt181 Mar 14 '11 at 7:03
    
You'd need contravariance to do so, but you can't do that in classes (it's limited to delegates and interfaces) and, sadly, IList<T> interface isn't contravarianceable! So, your option is to create a ICovariancableList<out T> implementing IList<T> too. And you'll need a base class without price value and no generic parameter, so T will be a derived class of Product. – Matías Fidemraizer Mar 14 '11 at 8:47

I would go for simplification, since this code has a certain bad smell to it.

Why don't you use the PriceList in SpecialProduct inside Product as well, and make the sub-dictionary have just one value always of PriceType.Default or something like that? You would then be able to use all Products without requiring any casts or checks.

share|improve this answer

What about this approach?


public abstract class AProductBase<T>
{
  public IDictionary<string, T> PriceList { get; set; }
  ...
}

public class Product : AProductBase<decimal>
{
  ...
}

public enum PriceTypeEnum { ... }

public class SpecialProduct : AProductBase<IDictionary<PriceTypeEnum, decimal>>
{
  ...
}

Perhaps this fits better your requirements.

Regards

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