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Suppose I have:

typedef unsigned long long uint64;

unsigned char data[BUF_SIZE];    

uint64 MyPacket::GetCRC()
{
  return (uint64)(data[45] | data[46] << 8 | 
         data[47] << 16 | data[48] << 24 |
         (uint64)data[49] << 32| (uint64)data[50] << 40 |
         (uint64)data[51] << 48| (uint64)data[52] << 56);
}

Just wondering, if there is an cleaner way. I tried a memcpy to an uint64 variable but that gives me the wrong value. I think I need the reverse. The data is in little endian format.

share|improve this question
    
Ahh.. you've defined data now. Thanks. So don't you need casts to uint64 on the data[46],[47] & [48] before you shift them? –  GrahamS Mar 8 '11 at 9:29
    
it seems not. But for completeness i might add –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 9:39
    
Sorry - my mistake, the shift operator promotes automatically: msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/336xbhcz.aspx –  GrahamS Mar 8 '11 at 9:51
1  
To make in work when "int" is 16 bits, a cast to (at least) a 32 bit type must be added for data[47] and data[48], so you were partially correct @GrahamS. –  Lindydancer Mar 8 '11 at 10:00
    
I am taking a guess here, but I think that shift operation in C++ should work logically the same regardless of the "endianity". So what you seem to be doing is making the MSByte of the CRC the LSB in your computed value. Is this what you intend? –  davka Mar 8 '11 at 10:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Nothing much wrong with what you have there to be honest. It will work and it's quick. The thing I'd change would be to format it a little better for readability:

uint64 MyPacket::GetCRC()
{
  return (uint64) data[45]       | 
         (uint64) data[46] << 8  | 
         (uint64) data[47] << 16 | 
         (uint64) data[48] << 24 |
         (uint64) data[49] << 32 | 
         (uint64) data[50] << 40 |
         (uint64) data[51] << 48 | 
         (uint64) data[52] << 56;
}

I guess your other option would be to do it in a loop instead:

uint64 MyPacket::GetCRC()
{
   const int crcoffset = 45;
   uint64 crc = 0;

   for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
   {
       crc |= (uint64)data[i + crcoffset] << (i * 8);
   }
   return crc;
}

That would probably result in very similar assembly (as the compiler would probably do loop-unwinding for such a small loop) but it is a bit harder to grok in my opinion so you are better off with what you have.

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Thanks for the tip...looks like it's fairly optimal already. I prefer your formatting style over mine. –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 10:46

The big advantage of using the shift-or sequence is that it will work regardless if your host machine is big- or little-endian.

Of course, you would always tweak the expression. Personally, I try to join "pairs", that is two bytes at a time, then two shorts, and finally two longs, as this will help compilers to generate better code.

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This will always be run on a little endian machine. Some good suggestions there. –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 9:13

Well, maybe better idea is to swap order + cast?

typedef unsigned long long uint64;

unsigned char data[BUF_SIZE];    

uint64 MyPacket::GetCRC()
{
  uint64 retval;
  unsigned char *rdata = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&retval);
  for(unsigned i = 0; i < 8; ++i) rdata[i] = data[52-i];
  return retval;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like reverse is not needed for little endian hardware. So the 52-i should be 45+i instead. –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 10:45
    
Well, if you don't need reversing, alone cast will suffice: return *reinterpret_cast<uint64*>(&data[45]). However you wrote yourself, that you need to reverse bytes to get the right value. –  x13n Mar 9 '11 at 8:01

Here's one of my own that is similar to that provided by @x13n.

uint64 MyPacket::GetCRC()
{
    int offset=45;
    uint64 crc;
    memcpy(&crc, data+offset, 8);
    //std::reverse((char*)&crc, (char*)&crc + 8); // if this was a big endian machine
    return crc;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code assumes that it should be executed on a big-endian machine, it will yield the wrong result when executed in a little-endian environment. –  Lindydancer Mar 8 '11 at 9:56
    
Right you are... I don't need the reverse afterall –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 10:43

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