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I need a regex to use in a C# App with the follow structure:

  • domains separated by semicolon

Valid Example:;;

How can i do that with a single Regex?

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Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems. –  Alex Mar 8 '11 at 13:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Given my aversion to regex in general, I am compelled to post an alternative (banking on the fact that you're going to need the individual domain representations as separate entities at some point anyway):

string[] domains = delimitedDomains.Split(';');

Where delimitedDomains is a string of domains in the format mentioned and the result being an array of each individual domain entry found.

It may well be that there are more cases to your scenario than precisely detailed, however, if this is the extent of your goal and the input then this should suffice quite well.

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Regex is powerful and with great power comes great opportunity to mess things up. Use split. –  Spaceghost Mar 8 '11 at 13:29
i expected a merge of ^([^\.;]+\.[^\.;]+;)*$ (delimiter) AND ^([a-zA-Z0-9]([a-zA-Z0-9\-]{0,61}[a-zA-Z0-9])?\.)+[a-zA-Z]{2,6}$ (domain Validation). –  Esteban Lopez Mar 8 '11 at 13:43
@Esteban Lopez: Validating the domain entities would have already been done to, I'm darn certain you could utilise .NET's Uri.CheckHostName method once you've obtained each of them. –  Grant Thomas Mar 8 '11 at 14:04


var domains = example.Split(";".ToCharArray(), 
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i already saw that solution, but i need something more pretty and more elegant, like a regular expression. –  Esteban Lopez Mar 8 '11 at 13:28
@Esteban Lopez: using pretty and elegant in one sentence is simply unacceptable when referring to regex. Using regex for this, and only this, can only be summed up as using a sledgehammer to crack a nut. –  Grant Thomas Mar 8 '11 at 13:29
Using regex just to make it "pretty" when something is already simple and elegant is a horrible idea. –  jlafay Mar 8 '11 at 13:30
@jlafay: there is no overload for this method which takes a simple char and use of StringSplitOption; that's why I use .ToCharArray() here –  Alex Mar 8 '11 at 13:33
@Alex, I was wondering why you did that. Sorry about that. –  jlafay Mar 8 '11 at 13:35

Use this one:

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Could try


Depending on if you want specific domain names you may have to alter it

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You can use [^;]+ but C# has a split function which will work well for this(if you can avoid regex I would do so)

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Using Mr. Disappointment's suggestion, I don't know what all the Uri.IsWellFormedUriString method does, but, in theory, if you want to perform both steps (separate and validate) in one, I would think you could use LINQ to do something like this:

(editted this to use Uri.CheckHostName instead of Uri.IsWellFormedUriString)

string src = ";; ...";
string[] domains = src.Split(';').Where(x => Uri.CheckHostName(x) != UriHostNameType.Unknown).ToArray();
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IsWellFormedUriString won't work in this instance, since the domains don't have a protocol prefix. –  Grant Thomas Mar 9 '11 at 14:13
Thanks for pointing that out. I've edited to be more along the lines of what (I think) you were actually suggesting originally. Would the new version work to consolidate the two steps into one? –  Steven Mar 9 '11 at 14:22
I guess so, while also breaking the whole routine should any single value of x cause CheckHostName to raise an exception. –  Grant Thomas Mar 9 '11 at 14:24
That's a good point, but from the MSDN (, it looks as though the method won't raise an exception in case of problematic value; it will return a value of "Unknown". To be clear, I'm not nec. advocating trying to lump the two steps into one as it seems less clear when the results don't line up with what might be expected, but it sounds like Esteban wants to do this, and as you suggested, letting URI do the validation seems more reliable than trying to hand-craft a RegEx. –  Steven Mar 9 '11 at 15:01
I have to concur. –  Grant Thomas Mar 9 '11 at 15:54

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