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template<class T>
struct TypeX;

template<>
struct TypeX<int(...)>//HERE IF WITHOUT ELLIPSIS IT WILL COMPILE
{
    static std::string get_type()
    {
        return "int()";
    }
};

template<>
struct TypeX<int>
{
    static std::string get_type()
    {
        return "int";
    }
};

template<class T>
struct type_descriptor
{
    typedef T type;
    typedef typename std::remove_reference<T>::type no_ref_type;
    typedef typename std::remove_pointer<no_ref_type>::type no_ref_no_pointer_type;
    typedef typename std::remove_cv<no_ref_no_pointer_type>::type no_ref_no_pointer_no_cv_type;
    typedef typename std::remove_all_extents<no_ref_no_pointer_no_cv_type>::type no_ref_no_pointer_no_cv_no_ext_type;
    typedef no_ref_no_pointer_no_cv_no_ext_type bare_type;

    enum {isArray = std::is_array<T>::value, isPointer = std::is_pointer<T>::value, isRef = std::is_reference<T>::value};

    static std::string get_type()
    {
        return pointer_<isPointer>() + array_<std::is_array<no_ref_no_pointer_type>::value>() + TypeX<bare_type>::get_type();

    }
};
template<bool C>
std::string array_()
{return "";}

template<>
std::string array_<true>()
{return "array of";}

template<bool C>
std::string pointer_()
{return "";}

template<>
std::string pointer_<true>()
{return "pointer to";}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    cout << type_descriptor<int(*)()>::get_type();

    return 0;
}

Please see comment in a code. The question is why if I specialize for ellipsis, which suppose to mean any number I'm getting an error, but when I specialize for no arguments it compiles?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The question is why if I specialize for ellipsis, which suppose to mean any number I'm getting an error, but when I specialize for no arguments it compiles?

Because ellipsis doesn't imply any number of parenthesis (as you're trying to use it in main) . ellipsis is used to imply variable number of arguments in function (C++03).


EDIT: Maybe the following example gives you enough hint to implement what you want to:

template<class T>
struct TypeX
{
        TypeX() { cout << "TypeX" << endl; }
};

template<typename T>
struct TypeX<T(*)()> //will match with : int (*)(), char (*)(), etc!
{
        TypeX() { cout << "TypeX<T(*)()>" << endl; }
};

template<typename T, typename S>
struct TypeX<T(*)(S)> //will match with : int (*)(int), char (*)(int), etc!
{
        TypeX() { cout << "TypeX<T(*)(S)>" << endl; }
};

template<typename T, typename S, typename U>
struct TypeX<T(*)(S, U)> //will match with : int (*)(int, char), char (*)(int, int), etc!
{
       TypeX() { cout << "TypeX<T(*)(S, U)>" << endl; }
};
int main() {
        TypeX<int*>();
        TypeX<int(*)()>();
        TypeX<int(*)(int)>();
        TypeX<int(*)(char)>();
        TypeX<int(*)(char, int)>();
        TypeX<int(*)(short, char)>();
        return 0;
}

Output:

TypeX
TypeX<T(*)()>
TypeX<T(*)(S)>
TypeX<T(*)(S)>
TypeX<T(*)(S, U)>
TypeX<T(*)(S, U)>

Demo at ideone : http://www.ideone.com/fKxKK

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I don't understand, could you explain? In main I'm trying to use specialization for: pointer to fnc taking zero args and returning int. –  There is nothing we can do Mar 8 '11 at 21:12
    
@There is nothing we can do: Actually the syntax <int(...)> is not allowed in specialization. You've to do this: ideone.com/ah1iH ........ let me know if you've any further question! –  Nawaz Mar 10 '11 at 7:31
    
@There is nothing we can do: I edited my answer. Please let me know how much it helps you... with these more examples : ideone.com/fKxKK –  Nawaz Mar 10 '11 at 8:13
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An elipsis means the function can accept any number of arguments at each place of invocation.

int f(...);  // signature

int x = f();   // invocations
int y = f(my_int, my_double);

The function signature itself is distinct from the more specific signatures naively implied by each invocation (i.e. int f(), int f(int, double)).

Therefore, while you can specialise for the int (*)(...) case, only a function type that actually specifies an initial elipsis will match. Other functions like int (*)(int) do not match.

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