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I get the feeling that this is, but I wanted to confirm- is it bad form to do something like:

try
{
    SqlUpload(table);
}
catch(PrimaryKeyException pke)
{   
          DeleteDuplicatesInTable(table);
          SqlUpload(table);
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    Console.Write(ex);
}

Is it better to do this to potentially save on efficiency in case the table doesn't have duplicates, or is it better to run the delete duplicates bit anyway? (I'm assuming conditions where the table will upload as long as there are no duplicates within the table itself). Also, given how try-catch statements impact performance, would it even be faster to do it this way at all?

I apologize for the crude nature of this example, but it was just to illustrate a point.

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I'm not an SQL expert, but if primary key exception has more than one case, and the case you get is not 'duplicate' then the second call to SqlUpload will fail –  Chimoo Mar 8 '11 at 15:36
    
This doesn't address the SQL efficiency but change the handling to catch(PrimaryKeyException pke){}catch(other exceptions){} –  CheeZe5 Mar 8 '11 at 15:37
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7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, this type of code is considered bad form in .NET.

You would be better off writing either code similar to

if(HasPrimaryKeyViolations(table))
    DeletePrimaryKeyViolations(table)

SqlUpload(table)
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Coincidentally, you could just call the Delete method every time if your intent is to firehose that data in anyway. –  Chris Marisic Mar 8 '11 at 15:37
    
Ah, yes, it seems so obvious now. Thanks. –  SeanVDH Mar 8 '11 at 15:38
1  
I disagree. The HasPrimaryKeyViolations is entirely unnecessary because DeletePrimaryKeyViolations will just have to repeat that work. –  Gabe Mar 8 '11 at 15:39
    
It depends on what happens most frequently. If primary key violations are very rare you've just doubled the run time for no good reason. –  arx Mar 8 '11 at 15:40
1  
@Chris Marisic - Unnecessary round-trips to the database are a guaranteed performance killer. When you decide not to use an exception you've already made a decision about "how exceptional" the event is and, as Gabe pointed out, if you've decided that primary key violations are frequent you should be doing the Delete and Upload in a single transaction. "Premature optimization is the root of all evil" should not be misinterpreted to mean "it's OK to write code whose performance is guaranteed to be poor even though it's no more effort to get it right". –  arx Mar 8 '11 at 16:44
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Exceptions can be used correctly in transaction management, but it is not the case in this example. On my first look, it appeared that this seemed similar to what Linq2Sql's DataContext class does in its call to SubmitChanges(). However, that analogy was incorrect. (Please see at Chris Marisic's comment to my post for an accurate criticism of the comparison).

On exceptions

In general, if there is some issue that is likely to be encountered, you should check for it first. Exceptions should be used when a response is truly "exceptional" (meaning it is unexpected in the context of proper usage). If the proper usage of a function within a completely valid context throws an exception , then you are probably using exceptions incorrectly.

Excerpt from DataContext.SubmitChanges

This code shows an example of the correct usage of exceptions in transaction management.

Note: Just because Microsoft does it, doesn't automatically mean its right. However, their code does have a pretty good track record.

      DbTransaction transaction = null;
        try
        {
            try
            {
                if (this.provider.Connection.State == ConnectionState.Open)
                {
                    this.provider.ClearConnection();
                }
                if (this.provider.Connection.State == ConnectionState.Closed)
                {
                    this.provider.Connection.Open();
                    flag = true;
                }
                transaction = this.provider.Connection.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted);
                this.provider.Transaction = transaction;
                new ChangeProcessor(this.services, this).SubmitChanges(failureMode);
                this.AcceptChanges();
                this.provider.ClearConnection();
                transaction.Commit();
            }
            catch
            {
                if (transaction != null)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        transaction.Rollback();
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                    }
                }
                throw;
            }
            return;
        }
        finally
        {
            this.provider.Transaction = null;
            if (flag)
            {
                this.provider.Connection.Close();
            }
        }
    }
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I'm going to downvote soon unless you rebuttal my statement, your analogy you made here IMO is entirely wrong and is actually nefarious in this situation. This is an example of standard usage of try/catch/finally. This is not what the OP posted. For your analogy to be relevant here the catch block should repeat code from the try block. The code here is substantially different than the OP's sample. This usage of try/catch is a safety net to release resources in the event of an unhandled error, this example does not handle the error, nor does it replay the action. –  Chris Marisic Mar 8 '11 at 15:59
    
I changed my post. - Your criticism was accurate. However, I still feel that my post as it is now does contribute to the thread, so I have not removed it entirely. –  smartcaveman Mar 8 '11 at 16:17
    
@Chris Marisic, If you add something in your answer to help explain the correct usage of exceptions, I will remove mine. –  smartcaveman Mar 8 '11 at 16:19
    
+1 this is very relevant to the discussion now as an example of good practices. –  Chris Marisic Mar 8 '11 at 17:30
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By reading this code I would assume that primary key violations are an exceptional case and not expected - if they are I think you should remove the duplicates beforehand, do not rely on exception handling for an expected case.

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In all common languages/interpreters/compilers, exception handling is implemented to have a minimal performance impact when an exception isn't raised -- under the hood, adding an exception handler is usually just pushing a single value onto a stack or something similar. Just adding a try block wont usually have a performance impact.

On the other hand, when an exception is actually raised, things can get very slow very fast. Its the trade-off for being able to add the try block without worrying about worrying, and its usually seen as acceptable, because you only take the performance hit if something unexpected has already gone wrong somewhere else.

So, in theory, if there is a condition that you expect to happen, use an if instead. Its semantically better because it expresses to the reader that the bad condition is probably going to happen from time to time (e.g., user types in some invalid input), while the try expresses something that you hope never happens (the data source is corrupt). As above, its also going to be easier on performance.

Of course, rules are defined by their exceptions (no pun intended). In practice, there are two situations where this becomes the wrong answer:

First, if you are performing a complex operation like parsing a file, and its and all-or-nothing -- if one field in the file is corrupt, you want to bail on the whole operation. Exceptions allow you to jump out of the whole complex process up to an exception handler encapsulating the entire parse. Sure, you could litter the parsing code with checks and return values and checks on the return values -- but its going to be a lot cleaner just to throw the exception and let it rise up to the top of the operation. Even if you expect that the input is going to be bad sometimes, if there isn't a reasonable way to handle the error exactly at the point where the error occurs, use exceptions to let the error rise up to a more appropriate place to handle it. Thats really what exceptions were for in the first place -- getting rid of all that error handling code down in the details, and moving it to one, consolidated, reasonable place.

Second, a library might not let you make the choice. For example, int.TryParse is a good alternative to int.Parse if the input hasn't already been vetted. On the other hand, a library might not have a non-exception-throwing option. In that case, don't brew up your own code to check without exceptions -- though it might be bad form to use exception handling to check for an expected condition, its worse form to duplicate the functionality of the library, just to avoid an exception. Just use the try/catch, and maybe add a snide comment about how you didn't WANT to do it, but the library authors MADE you :).

For your particular example, probably stick with the exception. While exception handling isn't considered 'fast,' its still faster than a round trip to the database; and there isn't going to be a reasonable way to check for that exception without sending the command anyways. Plus, hitting a database in interfacing with an external system -- that in itself is a pretty to good reason to expect the unexpected -- exception handling almost always makes sense when you are leaving your particular controlled environment.

Or, more specifically to your example, you may consider using a stored procedure with a MERGE statement, to use the source data in table to update or insert as appropriate; the update will be a little friendlier on all fronts than doing a delete-then-insert for existing keys.

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try catches are expensive on performance, so don't use them as control structures. Instead use triggers at the database level.

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One problem is that any exception caused by call of SqlUpload() in the catch block causes the application to crash, because there is no further exception handling.

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This was a very crude example, and I apologize again for that. I will try to provide better ones in the future. –  SeanVDH Mar 8 '11 at 15:44
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You'll probably get a few different opinions on this, but mine is that try...catch should be used for things that shouldn't normally happen (although sometimes it's unavoidable). So by that rule, you should ask if the duplicates are in the table by normal execution of the program or if they should not exist given allowable execution of the program.

Just to clarify, I'm saying "normal" usage of the program, not "correct" usage (e.g. when I test it the duplicates don't appear (correct usage) but when the customer uses it they do (perhaps incorrect but normal), so I need to get rid of them). It's more that the duplicates would only appear in a way that the program cannot control (e.g. sometimes someone goes into the database and adds a duplicate row (hopefully not a normal situation)).

Something like duplicate rows, though, is likely a symptom of some other bug, so you shouldn't mask it but try and find the root cause so that the deletion isn't necessary.

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