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How do you normally load and store stuff from the DB in global constants for caching during initialisation? The global constants will not change again later. Do you just make the DB query during load time and put it in a constant, or use a lazy loading mechanism of some sort?

What I have in mind is code in the global scope like this:

SPECIAL_USER_GROUP = Group.objects.get(name='very special users')
OTHER_THING_THAT_DOESNT_CHANGE = SomeDbEnum.objects.filter(is_enabled=True)
# several more items like this

I ran into issues doing that when running tests using an empty test database. An option would be to put all the needed data in fixtures, but I want to avoid coupling each individual test with irrelevant data they don't need.

Would the following be considered good style?

@memoize
def get_special_user_group():
    return Group.objects.get(name='very special users')

Or would a generic reusable mechanism be preferred?

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You can't store and load things into constants, you can only set them at instantiation. –  kramthegram Mar 8 '11 at 17:25
    
I did actually mean initialisation (i.e. module load time), not setting them over and over again. My problem is that during module loading, I do not want any queries to the DB. –  Erik Allik Mar 9 '11 at 16:28
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2 Answers

Django has a cache framework that you could use.

http://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/cache/

It's got a low level caching api that does what you want.

from django.core.cache import cache
cache.set('my_key', 'hello, world!', 30)
cache.get('my_key')

To use it, you'd do something like

if cache.get("key"):
    return cache.get("key")
else:
    value = some_expensive_operation()
    cache.set("key",value)
    return value

Using something like this will give you more flexibility in the future.

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I have over 15 of "constants" like this defined at the module level. The question is about managing the initialisation and caching/memoisation of all of them in a uniform way. I do not want all the 6 lines of code per each item. –  Erik Allik Mar 9 '11 at 16:24
    
If these are truly constants that don't change, why are they even in the database? Just do a Django settings.py style configuration file. –  Marc Hughes Mar 10 '11 at 13:58
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An option would be to put all the needed data in fixtures,

Good thinking.

but I want to avoid coupling each individual test with irrelevant data they don't need.

Then define smaller fixtures.

If necessary, use the TestCase setUp method to create the necessary database row.

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The question is not about test data, if that's what you meant. Since it's not test data, I don't want to be forced into having it in the database during testing. –  Erik Allik Mar 9 '11 at 16:31
    
@Erik Allik: Clearly, you don't know how Django unit testing works. It puts data into a database during teting. "I don't want to be forced into having it in the database during testing." Doesn't make much sense given that Django puts data into the database during testing. –  S.Lott Mar 9 '11 at 17:49
    
I was talking about irrelevant data that is not needed for a particular test, or any tests at all. (and all in all, the question was not about testing nor test data anyway) –  Erik Allik Mar 10 '11 at 8:09
    
@Erik Allik: (1) "How do you normally load and store stuff from the DB in global constants for caching during initialisation" (2) "I ran into issues doing that when running tests" (3) "the question was not about testing nor test data". Since your comment contradicts your question, please update the question to be more clear. You have a problem testing. The problem is solved by fixtures. Or you have a problem initializing, in which case the problem is still solved by fixtures. I'm not sure what more clarification you need, so please update the question to explain. –  S.Lott Mar 10 '11 at 10:51
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