Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a trivial antlr grammar for expressions like a.b.c + d.e.f:

grammar Test;
options {
    output=AST;
}
tokens {
    VARIABLE_ID;
    QUALIFIER_ID;
}

ID  : ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'_') ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'0'..'9'|'_')*;
DOT : '.';
WS : ( ' ' | '\t' | '\r' | '\n' ) {$channel=HIDDEN;} ;

variable_id  : id=ID   -> VARIABLE_ID[$id];
qualifier_id  : id=ID   -> QUALIFIER_ID[$id];

expr_start : expr EOF;
expr : var (options {greedy=true;} : '+' expr)*;

var : variable_id (DOT qualifier_id)*;

Now I want to define a pattern matcher over this grammar that turns a.b.c into 0.1.2, so I define a Tree Pattern Matcher as follows

tree grammar TestWalker;
options {
    tokenVocab=Test;
    ASTLabelType=CommonTree;
    filter=true;
    backtrack=true;
}

@members {
    TokenRewriteStream tokens;

    public void setTreeNodeStream(TreeNodeStream input) {
        super.setTreeNodeStream(input);
        tokens = (TokenRewriteStream)input.getTokenStream(); 
    }
}

topdown : var;

variable_id [int i] : id=VARIABLE_ID {
    tokens.replace($id.getToken(), "" + $i);
};

qualifier_id [int i] : id=QUALIFIER_ID {
    tokens.replace($id.getToken(), "" + $i);
};

var 
@init { int index = 0; }
: variable_id[index] 
(   DOT 
    { ++index; }
    qualifier_id[index]
)*;

Then I put together a small test program:

import org.antlr.runtime.*;
import org.antlr.runtime.tree.*;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        TestLexer lex = new TestLexer(new ANTLRInputStream(System.in));
        TokenStream tokens = new TokenRewriteStream(lex);

        TestParser parser = new TestParser(tokens);
        TestParser.expr_return expr = parser.expr();

        CommonTreeNodeStream nodes = new CommonTreeNodeStream((Tree)expr.getTree());
        nodes.setTokenStream(tokens);
        TestWalker walker = new TestWalker(nodes);
        walker.downup(expr.getTree());
        System.out.println(tokens.toString());
    }
}

When I run this program with basic input, I see surprising results:
a.b.c -> 0.b.c
a.b + d.e -> 0.b + 0.e
and so on. It appears that the (DOT qualifier_id)* portion of my rule never matches and I cannot figure out why. I have tried adding my rules to the topdown and the bottomup portions of the Tree Pattern Match. If I switch from a filter matcher to a whole tree matcher and add rules to branch for the '+' case appropriately it works, but when the rewrite is just a smaller fragment of a much larger grammar this becomes untenable. Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Update: Using antlr 3.3

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

I am not familiar with this (relatively new) pattern-tree walking. I glanced over it on the Wiki, but it's not in my copy of the ANTLR reference.

There is something not 100% with your Test grammar though: when I generate a parser from it, I get:

java -cp antlr-3.2.jar org.antlr.Tool Test.g
warning(200): Test.g:18:46: Decision can match input such as "'+'" using multiple alternatives: 1, 2
As a result, alternative(s) 2 were disabled for that input

and when I visualize the AST your parser produces using your class (with a small addition):

import org.antlr.runtime.*;
import org.antlr.runtime.tree.*;
import org.antlr.stringtemplate.*;

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        TestLexer lex = new TestLexer(new ANTLRStringStream("a.b + d.e"));
        TokenStream tokens = new TokenRewriteStream(lex);

        TestParser parser = new TestParser(tokens);
        TestParser.expr_return expr = parser.expr();

        CommonTreeNodeStream nodes = new CommonTreeNodeStream((Tree)expr.getTree());
        nodes.setTokenStream(tokens);

        CommonTree tree = (CommonTree)expr.getTree();

        DOTTreeGenerator gen = new DOTTreeGenerator();
        StringTemplate st = gen.toDOT(tree);
        System.out.println(st);

        TestWalker walker = new TestWalker(nodes);
        walker.downup(tree);
        System.out.println(tokens.toString());
    }
}

I see that the input a.b + d.e produces the AST:

enter image description here

I imagine your tree walker is iterating over said tree, which doesn't surprise me it doesn't produce the desired result since it's just a flat list of nodes with a single root.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, that error message does not show up in antlr3.3 (which is what I am using) –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 20:58
    
@Matt, well, it's not a serious warning: the lexer & parser are generated after all. What is serious (AFAIK) is the fact that a flat AST is generated. At least, I think your tree-pattern-grammar does not like it... :) –  Bart Kiers Mar 8 '11 at 21:01
    
I see the same thing using DOTTreeGenerator, but when I use antlr works I see a full parse tree. –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 21:17
1  
@Matt, ANTLRWorks creates a parse tree on its own (which is not available to you). To create a proper AST, see this previous Q&A. –  Bart Kiers Mar 8 '11 at 21:30
    
@Bart Thanks, let me chug on this for a while and get back to you. –  Matt Mar 8 '11 at 21:34
show 1 more comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The crux of the issue (as identified by @Bart) is that the parse was not properly generating an AST. The grammar needs to build the AST (note the addtional ^ tokens).

grammar Test;
options {
    output=AST;
}
tokens {
    VARIABLE_ID;
    QUALIFIER_ID;
}

ID  : ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'_') ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z'|'0'..'9'|'_')*;
DOT : '.';
WS : ( ' ' | '\t' | '\r' | '\n' ) {$channel=HIDDEN;} ;

variable_id  : id=ID   -> VARIABLE_ID[$id];
qualifier_id  : id=ID   -> QUALIFIER_ID[$id];

expr_start : expr EOF;
expr : var (options {greedy=true;} : '+'^ expr)*;

var : variable_id (DOT^ qualifier_id)*;

Then the tree pattern matcher needs to walk the AST as it is constructed. Note the structure of the expr rule and the arguments used to handle state.

tree grammar TestWalker;
options {
    tokenVocab=Test;
    ASTLabelType=CommonTree;
    filter=true;
    backtrack=true;
}

@members {
    TokenRewriteStream tokens;

    public void setTreeNodeStream(TreeNodeStream input) {
        super.setTreeNodeStream(input);
        tokens = (TokenRewriteStream)input.getTokenStream(); 
    }
}

topdown : expr[0];

variable_id returns [int r] : id=VARIABLE_ID {
    $r = 0;
    tokens.replace($id.getToken(), "" + $r);
};

qualifier_id [int i] returns [int r] : id=QUALIFIER_ID {
    $r = $i + 1;
    tokens.replace($id.getToken(), "" + $r);
};

expr [int i] returns [int r]
    : v=variable_id { $r = $v.r; }
    | ^(DOT e=expr[$i] q=qualifier_id[$e.r] { $r = $q.r; } )
    ;

Now the output will run as expected:
a.b + d.e + c.d.e.f
0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1.2.3
and the produced AST looks correct.

output AST

share|improve this answer
    
Great! Thanks for posting the solution +1. –  Bart Kiers Mar 8 '11 at 22:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.