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Pardon any mistaken terminology; I am relatively new to Scala. I will endeavor to clarify as necessary :)

I want to setup a function[T <: Closeable, R], with parameters T*, function (T*)=>R, then invoke the function with the T* varargs as it's arguments. This is probably much clearer in code:

import java.io.Closeable

object Loans {
    /**
     * works fine, yay! 
     * Eg: using(new FileWriter(file)) { fw => ...use fw... }
     */
    def using[T <: Closeable, R](c: T)(action: T => R): R = {
        try {
            action(c)
        } finally {
            if (null != c) c.close
        }
    }

    /**
     * Won't compile:
     *  type mismatch;  
     *  found: closeables.type (with underlying type T*)  
     *  required: T  possible cause: missing arguments for method or constructor    
     * 
     * Intended usage is:
     * 
     *  usingva(new FileWriter(f), new OtherCloseable()) { ... }
     */
    def usingva[T <: Closeable, R](closeables: T*)(action: (T*) => R): Unit = {
        try {
            action.apply(closeables)
        } finally {
            //...close everything...
        }
    }
}    

Unfortunately the usingva version doesn't compile and I am at somewhat of a loss for how best to accomplish the varargs loan structure.

Any and all advice much appreciated, ty.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You will have to put a :_* behind the parameter to tell the compiler that this is not one single argument but the entire seq of arguments:

action(closeables :_*)

Edit concerning your second question in the comment: For your specific problem it might be a better choice not to use varargs but the resulting Seq directly in combination with a partial function:

def usingva[T <: Closeable, R](closeables: T*)(action: PartialFunction[Seq[T], R]): Unit = {
  try {            
    action(closeables) 
  } 
  finally {
    //...close everything... 
  } 
}

this can then be used like this:

usingva(new FileWriter(file), new FileWriter(file) {
   case Seq(fw1,fw2) => ... // You can use fw1 and fw2 seperately here
}

There is unfortunately no way to make this typesafe (ie. check that number of parameters match the function at compile time) except for creating using functions for all numbers of parameters because there is no integer support on type level in scala. Same problem like tuples... that is why there are actually classes Tuple1, Tuple2, ... , Tuple22 (Yes... they stop at 22)

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OK; action(closeables: _*) and action.apply(closeables: _*) both compile. This may be a dumb question but is there a way to get the individual items into variables? That is, this works: usingva(new FileWriter(file), new FileWriter(file)) { fw => ... } but I'd prefer to be able to do something along the lines of usingva(new FileWriter(file), new FileWriter(file)) { fw1, fw2 => ... }. That is, to get each closeable in its own variable instead of getting one with FileWriter*? –  S42 Mar 8 '11 at 19:46
    
@S42: See my edit above –  Martin Ring Mar 8 '11 at 20:29
    
ty for the update; realistically creating 2 or 3 using functions is probably just fine but knowing how to write the general purpose one (to which the using 1/2/3/... functions likely delegate) is most helpful. –  S42 Mar 8 '11 at 21:22

You need to convert the varargs into a Seq for the type system (what Scala does internally).

action :  Seq[T] => R
share|improve this answer
    
Ty; this also works. It shares the issue with getting a single variable rather than individual ones in the using block (usingva(new FileWriter(file), new FileWriter(file)) { fw => ... }) where fw is now a Seq[T] and I'd ideally like to get something closer to usingva(new FileWriter(file), new FileWriter(file)) { fw1, fw2 => ... } –  S42 Mar 8 '11 at 19:52

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