Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a text file with list of numbers separated by blank line as given below- i want to add all the first (20.187+19.715+20.706...) , second elements (15.415+14.726+15.777) and so on to get the total of each element 1st,2nd,3rd etc

20.187 15.415  8.663  6.001  6.565  6.459  6.564 ..

19.715 14.726  8.307  5.833  6.367  6.089  6.444 ..

20.706 15.777  9.185  6.546  7.327  7.172  7.084 ...

since they are *not arranged in columns* how could i add up the elements of the array.

share|improve this question
1  
You edited to emphasize "not arranged in columns" ... I'm failing to understand this. You're asking how to add together all the Nth elements of each line (which all the answers below demonstrate). How is that "not arranged in columns" ? –  Brian Roach Mar 8 '11 at 18:57
    
@Brian Roach: My guess is he means that the columns are not fixed-width. However, split operates on delimiters, not fixed widths. –  Platinum Azure Mar 8 '11 at 19:00
    
the numbers are arranged in more than one line if they are many say 300 or so seperated by blank spaces , so in each block/group ,each column can have more than one number from each group..so adding it column wise i thought wont work –  user631148 Mar 8 '11 at 19:04
1  
Are you certain you're not just seeing line wrap when editing/displaying the file? If not, we'd (you'd) need to know what denotes a "block/group" in the file. –  Brian Roach Mar 8 '11 at 19:11
    
Ok ... got it now. The blank line is your group delimiter. See my edited answer below. –  Brian Roach Mar 8 '11 at 19:26
add comment

4 Answers

Use split to get all the fields. Keep track of a running total in an array (the indexed of which being mapped to the columns in your file).

Something like this:

while (<$file>)
{
  chomp;
  my $index = 0;
  $total[$index++] += $_ for split;
}

Note that split splits on whitespace by default. You can use other delimiters if you like.


EDIT: This answer is sadly useless, now that the question has been clarified. Use Brian Roach's answer instead.

share|improve this answer
    
I had no idea about that syntax for for. Sweet. –  Mat Mar 8 '11 at 18:48
1  
@Mat: Any of the loop statements have this capability, where you can modify any single statement's execution to flow based on the loop. If you want multiple statements, obviously you need to use a block. (You CAN also use do { # block } while $condition and similar, but sometimes you get different behavior. do-while will execute once, like in C, but statement-while will work like a normal while loop. So I usually just use either while { #block } or statement while $condition UNLESS I specifically need do-while functionality. Clear as mud? :-) –  Platinum Azure Mar 8 '11 at 18:52
    
@Mat: Oh, and you can't use any loop variable besides $_ when you do loop suffixes on single statements. That's the only pitfall. –  Platinum Azure Mar 8 '11 at 18:54
    
I would argue that another pitfall is using funky perl syntax for no performance gain while possibly confusing the next bloke who has to look at your code ;) –  Brian Roach Mar 8 '11 at 18:56
    
How else do you think I guarantee my job security? ;-) –  Platinum Azure Mar 8 '11 at 18:57
show 2 more comments

EDIT: From the clarified question, Need to deal with the blank lines and the possibility that a series of numbers is broken onto multiple lines.

my @totals;
my @currentVals;

while (my $line = <FILE>)
{
    chomp($line);
    if ($line eq "")
    {
        for ($i = 0; $i < @currentVals; $i++)
        {
            @totals[$i] += @currentVals[$i];
        }    
        @currentVals = ();
    }
    else
    {
        push @currentVals,  split(' ', $line);
    }

}

This should do what you're looking for. You need to keep adding onto the currentVals array until you hit a blank line, then do the math.

share|improve this answer
    
@user631148: THIS is the correct answer, now that the question has been clarified. Please disregard my answer. –  Platinum Azure Mar 8 '11 at 20:59
add comment
use strict;
use warnings;

# Paragraph mode (so that blank lines become our input delimiter).
local $/ = "\n\n";

my @totals;

while (<>){
    my $i;
    $totals[$i++] += $_ for split;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is certainly the "perl way to do it". Except you used a comment to actually explain the trick ;) –  Brian Roach Mar 8 '11 at 20:12
    
Oh snap. That will definitely do it! (+1) –  Platinum Azure Mar 8 '11 at 21:00
add comment

You could try something like this:

my @sum;
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    my @items = split /\s+/;
    for (my $i=0; $i<@items; $i++) {
        $sum[$i] += $items[$i];
    }
}

$sum[$i] will contain the total of column $i.

Or, slightly more 'perlish':

my @sum;
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    my @items = split;
    for my $i (0 .. $#items) {
        $sum[$i] += $items[$i];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is probably a lot clearer than mine anyway, now that I look at it. :-) (+1) I'm taking advantage of a lot of Perl defaults, like split with no arguments and single-statement-for. –  Platinum Azure Mar 8 '11 at 19:01
    
You got my (+1) - the C-style for loop always looks weird (IMO) in perl. –  Mat Mar 8 '11 at 19:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.