Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Do you see anything wrong in this code? in thosen't work well it returns a NaN.

public class Method2 extends GUIct1
{
double x=0,y=0;


void settype1 (double conv1)
{
x = conv1;
}

void settype2 (double conv2)
{
y = conv2;
}

double conversion ( double amount)
{


double converted = (amount*y)/x;
    return converted;
}

}

Way it is used an i already changed the set part

Method2 convert = new Method2(); \\ method is called

.....

convert.settype1(j);

.....

convert.settype2(k);

.....

double x = convert.conversion(i);
System.out.println(x);
share|improve this question
1  
Your get methods should be named set. –  unholysampler Mar 8 '11 at 19:05
    
the code snippet is incomplete. please update it. –  asgs Mar 8 '11 at 19:05
1  
You're initializing x with 0 in a class that divides by x - what did you expect to happen? It's like leaving fuel and matches in the wood and hoping nobody uses them together ;) –  schnaader Mar 8 '11 at 19:06
    
On which function? On conversion? If you don't set x to something other than zero you're going to get a divide by zero error. –  dmcnelis Mar 8 '11 at 19:06

3 Answers 3

Well, the fact that you've got methods which set variables called get-something is pretty obviously not a good idea, and there's no indentation... but it should work. But then, you haven't shown how you're using it. Perhaps you're not actually called the setter methods?

Here's an example of the same code but with different names, and a sample of using it:

class Converter
{
    double multiplier = 0;
    double divisor = 0;


    void setMultiplier(double multiplier)
    {
        this.multiplier = multiplier;
    }

    void setDivisor(double divisor)
    {
        this.divisor = divisor;
    }

    double convert(double amount)
    {
        return (amount * multiplier) / divisor;
    }
}

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Converter converter = new Converter();
        converter.setMultiplier(3.5);
        converter.setDivisor(8.5);
        System.out.println(converter.convert(2)); // Prints 0.8235294117647058
    }
}

Personally I'd probably make the variables final and set them in the constructor, but that's another matter...

share|improve this answer

It doesn't look like you ever call gettype1 or gettype2 so the x/y is 0/0 resulting in NaN

share|improve this answer
    
Well we haven't seen any code which calls conversion either, so we can't really tell what's going on... –  Jon Skeet Mar 8 '11 at 19:09

This can happen when x=0. Division by zero is not defined. Print out x and y before you start to calculate to see whetther they are not zero.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that and no till that point everything is working fine i guess –  John Smith Mar 8 '11 at 19:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.