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I'm trying to determine the existing HDDs in each system using a for loop as show below, the problem is when I try to set the variable using the below code i get sda=true: command not found. What is the proper way to do this?

#!/bin/bash
for i in a b c d e f
do
    grep -q sd$i /proc/partitions
    if [ $? == 0 ]
    then
        sd$i=true
    else
        sd$i=false
    fi
done
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declare sd$i=true So there is one catch I have found with this. When I use this in a function, the variable is null outside of the function. How do I get around this? –  scharacter Mar 9 '11 at 19:20
    
you would use export in this case. (I have updated my answer.) –  Mike Mar 10 '11 at 19:42
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to use an array or declare:

declare sd$i=true
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Worked perfectly thanks! –  scharacter Mar 8 '11 at 20:04
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I would use an array in this case. For example:

$ i=a
$ sd[$i]=true
$ echo ${sd[a]}
true

As another poster stated, if you want to do this without an array, you can instead make a local variable by using syntax like declare sd$i=true. If you want to make a global variable, use export sd$i=true.

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Unless you're using Bash 4 and associative arrays (declare -A sd), the index will resolve to 0 (unless a is a variable that ultimately resolves to a number). for i in {a..f}; do unset $i; sd[i]=true; done; declare -p sd will result in "declare -a sd='([0]="true")'" (only one element). –  Dennis Williamson Mar 8 '11 at 21:38
    
@Dennis, thanks for the heads up. (I was testing with bash 4.1.5.) –  Mike Mar 8 '11 at 21:41
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