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I have: An XML with some elements. A sub-element that may or may not be defined inside this XML. Need to extract the value of the sub-element when it does exist.

How do I get the value without throwing object-reference errors?

For example:

 string sampleXML = "<Root><Tag1>tag1value</Tag1></Root>"; 

//Pass in <Tag2> and the code works: 
//string sampleXML = "<Root><Tag1>tag1value</Tag1><Tag2>tag2Value</Tag2></Root>";    
 XDocument sampleDoc = XDocument.Parse(sampleXML);

//Below code is in another method, the 'sampleDoc' is passed in. I am hoping to change only this code
XElement sampleEl = sampleDoc.Root; 
string tag1 = String.IsNullOrEmpty(sampleEl.Element("Tag1").Value) ? "" : sampleEl.Element("Tag1").Value;

//NullReferenceException:
//Object reference not set to an instance of an object.
string tag2 = String.IsNullOrEmpty(sampleEl.Element("Tag2").Value) ? "" : sampleEl.Element("Tag2").Value;
share|improve this question
    
thanks everyone! I didn't expect so many people would help me out (and in such a short span of time). I wish I could mark all of your answers correct but I have upvoted your answer. I have encountered Null reference exceptions in a variety of situations, will save that for another day :) –  Amy Mar 8 '11 at 20:51
    
As a remark: This is one of the rare occasions where life is easier with Visual Basic: Dim tag2 = sampleXML.Root.<Tag2>.Value. The <Tag2> property returns a (possibly empty) collection of XElements, and the Value extension method returns the string value of the first item or Nothing otherwise. –  Heinzi Mar 8 '11 at 21:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First you should check if the document is null, remember you are accessing the .Value and this will throw a null reference exception so before you apply .value do a test:

if (sampleEl != null)
  //now apply .value

Or ternary:

string tag2 = sampleEl.Element("Tag2") != null ? sampleEL.Element("Tag2").Value : String.Empty

Your code then becomes:

 string sampleXML = "<Root><Tag1>tag1value</Tag1></Root>"; 

    //Pass in <Tag2> and the code works: 
    //string sampleXML = "<Root><Tag1>tag1value</Tag1><Tag2>tag2Value</Tag2></Root>";    
     XDocument sampleDoc = XDocument.Parse(sampleXML);

    //Below code is in another method, the 'sampleDoc' is passed in. I am hoping to change only this code
    XElement sampleEl = sampleDoc.Root; 
    string tag1 = sampleEl.Element("Tag1") != null ? sampleEl.Element("Tag1").Value : String.Empty;

    //NullReferenceException:
    //Object reference not set to an instance of an object.
string tag2 = sampleEl.Element("Tag2") != null ? sampleEL.Element("Tag2").Value : String.Empty
share|improve this answer

You can use the null-coalescing-operator for a shortcut:

 string tag1= (string)sampleEl.Element("Tag1") ?? string.Empty;

This also uses the fact that LINQ to XML allows the cast operation to get the value of the element (in this case cast to string), but returns null if the element does not exist.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice... I didn't know you could cast an XElement to a string –  andypaxo Mar 8 '11 at 20:42

The C# ternary operator is pretty good for this:

string tag2 = sampleEl.Element("Tag2") == null ? "" : sampleEl.Element("Tag2").Value;
share|improve this answer
1  
Prefer String.Empty to "" –  JonH Mar 8 '11 at 20:39
    
@JonH: Why? [...I don't like the min 15 char requirement...] –  Heinzi Mar 8 '11 at 20:47
    
@Heinzi - Its a personal preference. I don't like seeing code with a bunch "" "" "" "" "" "" "" in it. Seeing a constant is much more readable. –  JonH Mar 8 '11 at 20:48
    
@Heinzi: It doesn't make any significant difference to how the code runs. Just use whichever you find most readable (just like where you prefer to place your braces) –  andypaxo Mar 8 '11 at 20:53

You'll need to check for null in order to prevent them. Given the repeated pattern you're using I would just factor this off into an extension method.

public static string GetElementValue(this XElement parent, string elementName) {
  if (parent == null) { 
    return string.Empty;
  }
  var element = parent.Element(elementName);
  if (element == null || element.Value == null) {
    return string.Empty;
  }
  return element.Value;
}

Now your above code can be replaced with the following

string tag1 = sampleEl.GetElementValue("Tag1");
string tag2 = sampleEl.GetElementValue("Tag2");
share|improve this answer
    
In the method definition above, 'return element.Value.ToString()' will that be needed since I'm using everything as a string. Or is 'Value' already a string type? –  Amy Mar 8 '11 at 20:55
    
@Amy: Yes, it's a string: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Heinzi Mar 8 '11 at 20:56
    
thank you! nothing like the msdn documentation :) –  Amy Mar 8 '11 at 21:00
string tag1 = sampleEl.Element("Tag1") != null ? sampleEl.Element("Tag1").Value : string.Empty;
share|improve this answer

I came up with this extension method. It requires you to specify the property to access as a lambda, and a default value to use if the actual value or anything up the chain is null:

public static TOut ValueOrDefault<TIn, TOut>(this TIn input, Func<TIn, TOut> projection, TOut defaultValue)
        where TOut : class
    {
        try
        {
            return projection(input) ?? defaultValue;
        }
        catch (NullReferenceException)
        {
            return defaultValue;
        }
        catch (InvalidOperationException)
        {
            return defaultValue;
        }
    }

Usage:

var value = topObject.ValueOrDefault(x=>x.ChildObject.AnotherChild.ChildProperty, String.Empty);

value will be the empty string if topObject, ChildObject, AnotherChild, or ChildProperty are null. If all of those are valid references, the return will be whatever ChildProperty actually is (which could still be the empty string). The catch for the NullReferenceException handles references of child members of a null reference. For nullable types, InvalidOperationException is thrown when accessing the Value property of a null nullable type.

share|improve this answer
    
You can use default(T) to avoid using constraint –  abatishchev Mar 8 '11 at 20:39
    
Yes. I have an overload that just returns default(TOut) as well, but I thought this might be more useful as it looks like he wants the empty string. –  KeithS Mar 8 '11 at 20:45

Just for the fun of it, here's a solution using LINQ to XML which

  • requires only one statement and
  • does not need the ternary operator, so you don't need to specify the name of the tag twice:

    string tag1 = sampleEl.Elements("Tag1").Select(x => x.Value).FirstOrDefault();
    string tag2 = sampleEl.Elements("Tag2").Select(x => x.Value).FirstOrDefault();
    

Add ?? "" if you want the empty string instead of null if the tag does not exist.

share|improve this answer
1  
If sampleEl.Elements("Tag1") is null, this is still going to blow up. The source of a Linq operator cannot be null. –  KeithS Mar 8 '11 at 20:49
1  
@KeithS: Note that I wrote Elements, not Element. Elements returns an IEnumerable(XElement), which is never null. It might be empty, in which case Select will also return an empty IEnumerable and FirstOrDefault will return null (as desired). –  Heinzi Mar 8 '11 at 20:52

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