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In VS2010 Scrum 1.0 project template, can I create a PBI that has child PBIs? If not, what is a good alternative for large user stories aka product backlog items?

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Urban Turtle (urbanturtle.com) greatly simplifies the creation of child tasks in tfs. Have a look and send me your comments ddanis@pyxis-tech.com –  Dominic Danis Jun 22 '11 at 16:36
    
Don't make this your marketplace. –  bwerks Jun 4 '13 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The short and simple answer is yes. You can create a child PBI. Quite simply, under the Links tab, you add a new (or link to an existing) PBI work item.

The greater question is: Why do it?

Strictly speaking, from a Scrum point of view, you shouldn't have hierarchy in your user stories. The stories, as Mike Cohn (I believe) put it, you should INVEST in good stories. The 'I' stands for independent, which a story can't be if it is the child of another.

The only "Scrum-appropriate" reason to introduce a hierarchy is when you're breaking down a large story into small workable stories, or (rarely) molding to overly-small stories into one story of reasonable size.

Assaf.

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A Completely Agile answer! +1 –  sjt Mar 10 '11 at 2:50
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Doesn't it make sense for user stories and themes to retain some relationship to the themes and epics (respectively) from whence they came? This seems useful for me, but maybe this is supposed to be something that's done with TFS Areas instead? Advice appreciated. –  bwerks Jun 4 '13 at 16:05

You can do it, but like Assaf poitned out... why do you want do it? Large stories should be decomposed into smaller stories... stories that are small enough for the team to complete (done-done) in a single sprint.

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I came here to ask the same question as the OP; I agree that the process of refining large PBIs involves decomposing them into smaller PBIs, but creating them as children of the parent allows for organization and traceability. I don't think it breaks scrum principles to have this hierarchy, but I'd like to hear why if I'm wrong. –  bwerks Jun 4 '13 at 16:01

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