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Using WPF and Prism.

I have a view, containing 1 textblock

<UserControl x:Class="ArmoryModule.Views.ResultsView"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
             xmlns:Views="clr-namespace:ArmoryModule.Views" xmlns:vmdc="clr-namespace:ArmoryModule.ViewModels"
             mc:Ignorable="d">

    <UserControl.DataContext>
        <vmdc:ResultsViewModel />
    </UserControl.DataContext>

    <Grid>
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" />
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

attempting to bind to the pertinent part of ResultsViewModel below

class ResultsViewModel : ViewModel
{
    private Character _character;

    public Character Character
    {
        get { return _character; }
        set
        {
            if (_character != value)
            {
                _character = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged(() => Name);
            }
        }
    }

    public string Name
    {
        get { return _character.Name; }
    }
}

Builds fine, breaks at startup. I get an object ref not sent to an instance of an object error on

get { return _character.Name; }

I know character isn't populated at startup and thats the reason I'm getting the above error. I am kind of clueless as where to create Character so that the 2 viewmodels I have can use it.

share|improve this question
    
Just to be clear. With the setup you have, if you have code that does ViewModel.Character.Name = "new name", it will not fire the property changed notification and update the UI. This may not be something you need to do, just anticipating some confusion you may cause yourself. –  Chris Sainty Mar 8 '11 at 22:13
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Either add it to the constructor for the view model

public ResultsViewModel()
{
    _character = new Character();
}

or simply add a check in the getter, e.g.

get
{
    return _character != null ? _character.Name : string.empty;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It should be the latter, really, since there's nothing to stop a consumer setting the Character property to null later on. –  Dan Puzey Mar 8 '11 at 21:54
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Derp.

public string Name
{
    get { return _character == null ? string.Empty : _character.Name; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, downvoter, this fixes the problem entirely. Its called null checking, and should be done whether you're binding or not. Nyah. –  Will Mar 10 '11 at 15:08
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