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Meet Fred. He's a table:

One cell has more content and is wider, the other has less content and is narrower

<table border="1" style="width: 100%;">
    <tr>
        <td>This cells has more content</td>
        <td>Less content here</td>
    </tr>
</table>

Fred's apartment has a bizarre habit of changing size, so he's learned to hide some of his content so as not to push all the other units over and shove Mrs. Whitford's living room off into oblivion:

The cells are now the same size, but only one has its content truncated, and it looks like if the other cell gave if some whitespace, they could both fit.

<table border="1" style="width: 100%; white-space: nowrap; table-layout: fixed;">
    <tr>
        <td style="overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis">This cells has more content</td>
        <td style="overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis">Less content here</td>
    </tr>
</table>

This works, but Fred has a nagging feeling that if his right cell (which he's nicknamed Celldito) gave up a little space, his left cell wouldn't be truncated quite as much of the time. Can you save his sanity?


In summary: How can a table's cells overflow evenly, and only when they've all given up all their whitespace?

share|improve this question
46  
+1 For characterisation of a virtual object, nicely one sir :) –  Myles Gray Mar 8 '11 at 23:54
6  
I suspect you'll have to resort to JavaScript to solve this. –  thirtydot Mar 9 '11 at 7:59
6  
Lolz .. +1 for entertainment value :) ... does this need to be dynamic or can you not simply set a width on each column? –  Wardy Mar 10 '11 at 11:04

13 Answers 13

If Javascript is acceptable, I put together a quick routine which you could use as a starting point. It dynamically tries to adapt the cell widths using the inner width of a span, in reaction to window resize events.

Currently it assumes that each cell normally gets 50% of the row width, and it will collapse the right cell to keep the left cell at its maximum width to avoid overflowing. You could implement much more complex width balancing logic, depending on your use cases. Hope this helps:

Markup for the row I used for testing:

<tr class="row">
    <td style="overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis">
    <span>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</span>
    </td>
    <td style="overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis">
    <span>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</span>
    </td>
</tr>

JQuery which hooks up the resize event:

$(window).resize(function() {
    $('.row').each(function() {
        var row_width = $(this).width();
        var cols = $(this).find('td');
        var left = cols[0];
        var lcell_width = $(left).width();
        var lspan_width = $(left).find('span').width();
        var right = cols[1];
        var rcell_width = $(right).width();
        var rspan_width = $(right).find('span').width();

        if (lcell_width < lspan_width) {
            $(left).width(row_width - rcell_width);
        } else if (rcell_width > rspan_width) {
            $(left).width(row_width / 2);
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer

I believe I have a non-javascript solution! Better late than never, right? After all this is an excellent question and Google is all over it. I didn't want to settle for a javascript fix because I find the slight jitter of things moving around after the page is loaded to be unacceptable.

Features:

  • No javascript
  • No fixed-layout
  • No weighting or percentage-width tricks
  • Works with any number of columns
  • Simple server-side generation and client-side updating (no calculation necessary)
  • Cross-browser compatible

How it works: Inside the table cell place two copies of the content in two different elements within a relatively-positioned container element. The spacer element is statically-positioned and as such will affect the width of the table cells. By allowing the contents of the spacer cell to wrap we can get the "best-fit" width of the table cells that we are looking for. This also allows us to use the absolutely-positioned element to restrict the width of the visible content to that of the relatively-positioned parent.

Tested and working in: IE8, IE9, IE10, Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Opera

Result Images:

Nice proportional widths Nice proportional clipping

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/zAeA2/

Sample HTML/CSS:

<td>
    <!--Relative-positioned container-->
    <div class="container">
        <!--Visible-->
        <div class="content"><!--Content here--></div>
        <!--Hidden spacer-->
        <div class="spacer"><!--Content here--></div>
        <!--Keeps the container from collapsing without
            having to specify a height-->
        <span>&nbsp;</span>
     </div>
</td>

.container {
    position: relative;
}
.content {
    position: absolute;
    max-width: 100%;
    white-space: nowrap;
    overflow: hidden;
    text-overflow: ellipsis;
}
.spacer {
    height: 0;
    overflow: hidden;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If your content is an very long word without spaces, this isn't working but you just need to add hyphenation to the conent in spacer with &shy; jsfiddle.net/zAeA2/160 –  Riccardo Casatta Jun 18 at 9:23

The problem is the 'table-layout:fixed' which create evenly-spaced-fixed-width columns. But disabling this css-property will kill the text-overflow because the table will become as large as possible (and than there is noting to overflow).

I'm sorry but in this case Fred can't have his cake and eat it to.. unless the landlord gives Celldito less space to work with in the first place, Fred cannot use his..

share|improve this answer

You could try to "weight" certain columns, like this:

<table border="1" style="width: 100%;">
    <colgroup>
        <col width="80%" />
        <col width="20%" />
    </colgroup>
    <tr>
        <td>This cell has more content.</td>
        <td>Less content here.</td>
    </tr>
</table>

You can also try some more interesting tweaks, like using 0%-width columns and using some combination of the white-space CSS property.

<table border="1" style="width: 100%;">
    <colgroup>
        <col width="100%" />
        <col width="0%" />
    </colgroup>
    <tr>
        <td>This cell has more content.</td>
        <td style="white-space: nowrap;">Less content here.</td>
    </tr>
</table>

You get the idea.

share|improve this answer
    
This is simplest and works perfectly fine! –  Gopi Oct 9 '12 at 8:11
<table border="1" style="width: 100%;">
    <colgroup>
        <col width="100%" />
        <col width="0%" />
    </colgroup>
    <tr>
        <td style="white-space: nowrap; text-overflow:ellipsis; overflow: hidden; max-width:1px;">This cell has more content.This cell has more content.This cell has more content.This cell has more content.This cell has more content.This cell has more content.</td>
        <td style="white-space: nowrap;">Less content here.</td>
    </tr>
</table>

http://jsfiddle.net/7CURQ/

share|improve this answer
    
Ugh. Works so great, but i have no idea why, which makes me nervous :( –  Shaun Rowan Mar 28 at 15:32

Yep I would say thirtydot has it, there is no way to do it unless you use a js method. You are talking about a complex set of rendering conditions that you will have to define. e.g. what happens when both cells are getting too big for their apartments you will have to decide who has priority or simply just give them a percentage of the area and if they are overfull they will both take up that area and only if one has whitespace will you stretch your legs in the other cell, either way there is no way to do it with css. Although there are some pretty funky things people do with css that I have not thought of. I really doubt you can do this though.

share|improve this answer

I've been faced the same challenge few days ago. It seems Lucifer Sam found the best solution.

But I noticed you should duplicate content at spacer element. Thought it's not so bad, but I'd like also to apply title popup for clipped text. And it means long text will appear third time in my code.

Here I propose to access title attribute from :after pseudo-element to generate spacer and keep HTML clean.

Works on IE8+, FF, Chrome, Safari, Opera

<table border="1">
  <tr>
    <td class="ellipsis_cell">
      <div title="This cells has more content">
        <span>This cells has more content</span>
      </div>
    </td>
    <td class="nowrap">Less content here</td>
  </tr>
</table>
.ellipsis_cell > div {
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
    height: 1em;
}

/* visible content */
.ellipsis_cell > div > span {
    display: block;
    position: absolute; 
    max-width: 100%;
    white-space: nowrap;
    overflow: hidden;
    text-overflow: ellipsis;
    line-height: 1em;
}

/* spacer content */
.ellipsis_cell > div:after {
    content: attr(title);
    overflow: hidden;
    height: 0;
    display: block;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/feesler/HQU5J/

share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice! this deserves more upvotes –  lukasgeiter 2 days ago

Like samplebias answer, again if Javascript is an acceptable answer, I made a jQuery plugin specifically for this purpose: https://github.com/marcogrcr/jquery-tableoverflow

To use the plugin just type

$('selector').tableoverflow();

Full example: http://jsfiddle.net/Cw7TD/3/embedded/result/

Edits:

  • Fix in jsfiddle for IE compatibility.
  • Fix in jsfiddle for better browser compatibility (Chrome, Firefox, IE8+).
share|improve this answer
    
+1, perfectly working :-), thx –  justSaid Oct 15 '13 at 9:22

Check if "nowrap" solve the issue to an extent. Note: nowrap is not supported in HTML5

<table border="1" style="width: 100%; white-space: nowrap; table-layout: fixed;">
<tr>
    <td style="overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis;" nowrap >This cells has more content  </td>
    <td style="overflow: hidden; text-overflow: ellipsis;" nowrap >Less content here has more content</td>
</tr>

share|improve this answer
    
white-space: nowrap has the same effect as the nowrap attribute (and I’m using it in the example). Adding it here doesn’t change anything, as far as I can tell. –  Sidnicious May 23 '11 at 22:46

you can set the width of right cell to minimum of required width, then apply overflow-hidden+text-overflow to the inside of left cell, but Firefox is buggy here...

although, seems, flexbox can help

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I've been recently working on it. Check out this jsFiddle test, try it yourself changing the width of the base table to check the behavior).

The solution is to embedded a table into another:

<table style="width: 200px;border:0;border-collapse:collapse">
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td style="width: 100%;">
                <table style="width: 100%;border:0;border-collapse:collapse">
                    <tbody>
                        <tr>
                            <td>
                                <div style="position: relative;overflow:hidden">
                                    <p>&nbsp;</p>
                                    <p style="overflow:hidden;text-overflow: ellipsis;position: absolute; top: 0pt; left: 0pt;width:100%">This cells has more content</p>
                                </div>
                            </td>
                        </tr>
                    </tbody>
                </table>
            </td>
            <td style="white-space:nowrap">Less content here</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

Is Fred now happy with Celldito's expansion?

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the lack of response! I can’t see how this behaves any differently from a single table. When I view the fiddle in Chrome or Firefox, it looks exactly like the second screenshot from the question. Am I missing something? –  Sidnicious Jun 18 '12 at 0:58
    
Sorry, the link was not the one I posted. It's actually this one jsfiddle.net/VSZPV/2. Change the text of both cells and the width of the main table to test. Hope it's what you where looking for... –  I.G. Pascual Jun 18 '12 at 12:27

Don't know if this will help anyone, but I solved a similar problem by specifying specific width sizes in percentage for each column. Obviously, this would work best if each column has content with width that doesn't vary too widely.

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Given that 'table-layout:fixed' is the essential layout requirement, that this creates evenly spaced non-adjustable columns, but that you need to make cells of different percentage widths, perhaps set the 'colspan' of your cells to a multiple?

For example, using a total width of 100 for easy percentage calculations, and saying that you need one cell of 80% and another of 20%, consider:

<TABLE width=100% style="table-layout:fixed;white-space:nowrap;overflow:hidden;">
     <tr>
          <td colspan=100>
               text across entire width of table
          </td>
     <tr>
          <td colspan=80>
               text in lefthand bigger cell
          </td>
          <td colspan=20>
               text in righthand smaller cell
          </td>
</TABLE>

Of course, for columns of 80% and 20%, you could just set the 100% width cell colspan to 5, the 80% to 4, and the 20% to 1.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hey @Siubear. How’s that different from specifying a percent width on the tds? –  Sidnicious Jun 18 '12 at 2:49
    
Using colspan in such a way is a horrible idea. Why not use width instead? –  Percy Jan 4 '13 at 21:29

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