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How can I improve the following query as I think I am missing something and it can be done better :( I have table A and a one-to-many from A to B I want some info from A and the row from B that is linked to A with the highest sequence number. I came up with this:

SELECT A.*, 
 (
  SELECT B.value
  FROM   B 
  WHERE A.idB = B.id
  ORDER BY B.seqNr DESC LIMIT 1
 )
FROM A

Performance is important for me, so is this my best bet ?

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Don't use * if performance is that important for you. –  Jean-Christophe Fortin Mar 9 '11 at 0:53
    
What are the records in B where seqNr < MAX(seqNr) used for? Perhaps restructuring the tables is a better idea than rewriting the query. Even if it can be improved, this query is always going to perform worse than one that can do a simple join no better defined relationshps. –  Samuel Neff Mar 9 '11 at 1:54
    
The records contain payment transactions of A. A contains products. The almost never more then 5 payment transactions in B belonging to A –  edbras Mar 9 '11 at 8:44
    
I was also looking for a kind of inner join, but couldn't think of one :( –  edbras Mar 9 '11 at 8:44
    
I updated my answer with a suggested refactoring and simple inner join option. I'm sure I'll get some normalization purists yelling at me, but with proper triggers to ensure data is in sync, it's a safe refactoring and will provide significant performance improvements. –  Samuel Neff Mar 9 '11 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

That's probably your best bet, especially if you will only be visiting a small number of the rows from A and B.

If you are going to be covering all the rows anyway, you can try to address the problem with window aggregations assigning row numbers to rows from B:

SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT A.*, B.*, ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY B.id ORDER BY B.seqNr DESC) AS seqidx
  FROM A JOIN B ON A.idB = B.id
) WHERE seqidx = 1

This will use a lot of temp space though... consider just getting the A and B primary keys out of the aggregate and joining back onto them later (it's not clear from your query what your pkey columns are, since B.id apparently isn't)

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Yes, A, has almost never more then 5 related B rows. –  edbras Mar 9 '11 at 8:45

While bigger, it's possible this will perform better.

SELECT
    A.*,
    B3.value
FROM
    (
        SELECT  B.id, MAX(B.seqNr) MaxSeqNr
        FROM    B
        GROUP BY    B.id
    ) B2
            INNER JOIN
    B B3
            ON
        B2.id = B3.id AND B2.MaxSeqNr = B3.seqNr
            INNER JOIN
    A
            ON
        A.id = B3.id

Also possible it will perform worse. Need some real data to test and see. :-)

Also creating a compound index on B.id, B.seqNr DESC could improve performance of both your original and this alternate query.

If you can hold-off any theoretical purists in your organization you can significantly increase performance by adding a LatestPaymentForA field and using a trigger to keep this field in sync. Whenever a new record is inserted into B, update existing record B where LastPaymentFromA is true and has same id, then insert the new record with LastPaymentFromA to true.

Then you can do something really fast like this:

SELECT
    A.*,
    B.value
FROM
    A
            INNER JOIN
    B
            On
        A.id = B.id
WHERE
    B.LastPaymentFromA = 1
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