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I am wanting to build a validator (javascript) that can validate numbers from different countries,

I want to be able to call it using this skeleton phone('NZ', '049234567', false, false);

which is 'COUNTRY PREFIX`, 'NUMBER', 'LANDLINE', 'INTERNATIONAL'.

How would I go about doing such a thing?

Currently I am thinking of having something like

var phones = {
    NZ: {
        national: {
            landline: [
                '03{2,9}n(6)',  //read as 03[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '04{2,9}n(6)',  //read as 04[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '06{2,9}n(6)',  //read as 06[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '07{2,9}n(6)',  //read as 07[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '09{2,9}n(6)'   //read as 09[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
            ],
            mobile: [
                '020n(7,10)', //read as 020[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '021n(7,10)', //read as 021[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '022n(7,10)', //read as 022[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '027n(7,10)', //read as 027[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '029n(7,10)'  //read as 029[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
            ]
        },
        international: {
            landline: [
                '+643{2,9}n(6)',  //read as +643[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '+644{2,9}n(6)',  //read as +644[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '+646{2,9}n(6)',  //read as +646[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '+647{2,9}n(6)',  //read as +647[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
                '+649{2,9}n(6)'   //read as +649[a number between 2 and 9][a random number][repeat previous expression 6 times]
            ],
            mobile: [
                '+6420n(7,10)',  //read as +6420[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '+6421n(7,10)',  //read as +6421[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '+6422n(7,10)',  //read as +6422[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '+6427n(7,10)',  //read as +6427[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
                '+6429n(7,10)'   //read as +6429[a random number][repeat previous expression between 7 and 10 times]
            ]
        }
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

The World Telephone Number Guide is quite useful for national numbering plans, especially the exceptions. The ITU has freely available standards for lots of stuff too.

Keeping up to date with this info may be difficult, since the various country authorities may make "live" changes before these or other similar sites are updated. For example, the NZ entry on WTNG currently has around 70 number ranges.

Your best bet is probably to just to check for valid country codes, a minimum and maximum number of digits for the area code (which may be optional, or not required, for some countries) and the min/max length for the subscriber number.

From a UI point of view, a good layout I've seen has a drop down list containing country names and codes, and then separate area code and subscriber number text fields. The user can also enter spaces, dashes, etc. if they want; i.e. the user is always right :-).

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I think the rules for this are going to be prohibitively complex, and if you do this, you will have to write individual code for everything.

For example for the UK ( from this wikipedia page, with spaces removed for clarity )

+4420xxxxxxxx   London
+4429xxxxxxxx   Cardiff
+44113xxxxxxx   Leeds
+44116xxxxxxx   Leicester
+44131xxxxxxx   Edinburgh
+44151xxxxxxx   Liverpool
+441382xxxxxx   Dundee
+441386xxxxxx   Evesham
+441865xxxxxx   Oxford
+441204xxxxx    Bolton
+4415396xxxxx   Sedbergh
+4416977xxxx    Brampton

Note that some of those are different lengths, and if you want to spit out in the canonical format, there are tons of different spacing requirements for those, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi dre, Cheers for your answer, this looks very similar to what I am doing (see my edit) Do you have any other suggestion? –  Hailwood Mar 9 '11 at 1:50
    
If this is going to be just validation and not formatting, yeah -- but I would use standard regular expression formatting instead of your own home-cooked specification. '^\+649[2-9]\d{6,6}$' ( I am not sure on javascript's regex format exactly ) -- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression explains regexes in general. –  Dre Mar 9 '11 at 1:58
    
well, I lie a bit, not so much for validation, but for generating valid dummy data (its for a google chrome extension im build which is used to help fill out forms with test data) –  Hailwood Mar 9 '11 at 2:43

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