Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is a sample of what I would like to do

function test(r){
  var arr = ['d','e','f'];
  r.push(arr);
  /*
  More Code
  */
  return r;
}
var result = test(['a','b','c']);
alert(result.length);//I want this to alert 6

What I need to do is pass in an array and attach other arrays to the end of it and then return the array. Because of passing by reference I cannot use array.concat(array2);. Is there a way to do this without using something like a for loop to add the elements one by one. I tried something like r.push(arr.join()); but that did not work either. Also, I would like the option of having objects in the arrays so really the r.push(arr.join()); doesn't work very well.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted
>>> var x = [1, 2, 3], y = [4, 5, 6];
>>> x.push.apply(x, y) // or Array.prototype.push.apply(x, y)
>>> x
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting use of apply to push all members of an array onto another array +1 –  meouw Mar 9 '11 at 1:47
    
I had seen the apply method before, but never really understood it (note to self need to study up on apply), but it certainly makes a concise way of doing what I wanted. How does the second method differ from the first one though? Using the Array.prototype instead of x.push.apply. –  qw3n Mar 9 '11 at 1:55
    
Both are equivalent. Calling x.push(y) means "call the function x.push with scope x and the arguments [y]. In this case x.push resolves to Array.prototype.push, thus: Array.prototype.push.apply(x, [y]). I only mentioned the second form as it's sometimes preferable to only reference x once. –  emulbreh Mar 11 '11 at 18:10
add comment
function test(r){
  var _r = r.slice(0), // copy to new array reference
      arr = ['d','e','f'];

  _r = _r.concat(arr); // can use concat now

  return _r;
}
var result = test(['a','b','c']);
alert(result.length); // 6
share|improve this answer
1  
Wrong, the array you return is not the modified array that was passed to the function, it is a copy –  meouw Mar 9 '11 at 1:45
add comment

This is emulbreh's answer, I'm just posting the test I did to verify it. All credit should go to emulbreh

// original array
var r = ['a','b','c'];

function test(r){
  var arr = ['d','e','f'];
  r.push.apply(r, arr);

  /*
  More Code
  */
  return r;
}
var result = test( r );
console.log( r ); // ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f"]
console.log( result === r ); // the returned array IS the original array but modified
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.