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#include <stdio.h>
struct audiocd {
    char title[256];
    int trackNo;
    char type;
    char publisher[256];
};
int main() {
    struct audiocd* cdptr;
    struct audiocd cdarray[4];
    cdptr = cdarray;

    printf("%d\n", &(cdarray[2]));
    printf("%d\n", cdptr);
}

What is cdarray[2] & cdptr?

EDIT: Thanks, but if printf("%d\n", &cdarray) is 4291520 , is it possible to trace printf("%d\n", &(cdarray[2])) & printf("%d\n", cdptr)?

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4  
What do you mean by "what are they?" What part of this is confusing to you? –  James McNellis Mar 9 '11 at 2:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The overall effect of the program is simply undefined behavior. It's passing addresses to printf, but using the %d conversion, which expects an int. The mismatch causes undefined behavior.

In a typical case that int and a pointer happen to be the same size, it'll print out the address in cdptr and the address of cdarray[2].

If you want to print out those addresses, the obvious way is something like:

printf("%p", (void *)&cdarray[2]); // (void *)cdarray+2
printf("%p", (void *)cdptr);

As for what those expressions "are", they're addresses -- the addresses of the beginning of the array and the third element of the array, respectively.

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1  
didn't see %p before this post..thanks for the lesson. –  Jokester Mar 9 '11 at 3:09
    
@James: Good point -- corrected. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 9 '11 at 3:57

This is how you should print (%u instead of %d for printing address of pointers)

#include <stdio.h>
struct audiocd {
   char title[256];
   int trackNo;
   char type;
   char publisher[256];
};
int main() {
   struct audiocd* cdptr;
   struct audiocd cdarray[4];
   cdptr = cdarray;

   printf("%u\n", (cdarray[2]));
   printf("%u\n", cdptr);
}

By the way your code is just printing memory address of 1st and 3rd element of array of structure audiocd.

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1  
%u still gives undefined behavior. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 9 '11 at 2:43
    
%u is also not correct and will throw a warning during compile. %p is there specifically for pointers. –  Brian Roach Mar 9 '11 at 2:45
    
And if you were to not heed that warning, you'd probably want %x anyways to show it in hex. But you should heed the warning anyways. –  user470379 Mar 9 '11 at 2:46
    
Well %p is also just a shortcut for 0x%x. And %u will also print the same memory address in decimal instead of hex. –  anubhava Mar 9 '11 at 2:47
    
I didn't write the C99 spec ... I just follow it. If you like doing it wrong and getting compiler warnings, more power to you (%x also throws a warning) :) –  Brian Roach Mar 9 '11 at 2:51

thanks, but if printf("%d\n", &cdarray) is 4291520 , is it possible to trace printf("%d\n", &(cdarray[2])) & printf("%d\n", cdptr).

If I got your question correctly, I think you want to infer the values of &(cdarray[2]) and &(cdptr) from value of cdarray.

As you assigned cdarray to cdptr, cdptr will store the starting address of the array. Now &(cdarray[2]) is just

cdarray + 2*sizeof(struct audiocd)

Also, as discussed above, %p should be used to print memory addresses instead of %d.

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