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When calling a non-templated member function in a base class one can import its name with using into the derived class and then use it. Is this also possible for template member functions in a base class?

Just with using it does not work (with g++-snapshot-20110219 -std=c++0x):

template <typename T>
struct A {
  template <typename T2> void f() {  }
};

template <typename T>
struct B : A<T> {
  using A<T>::f;

  template <typename T2> void g() {
    // g++ throws an error for the following line: expected primary expression before `>`
    f<T2>();
  }
};

int main() {
  B<float> b;
  b.g<int>();
}

I know that prefixing the base class explicitly as in

    A<T>::template f<T2>();

works fine, but the question is: is it possible without and with a simple using declaration (just as it does for the case where f is not a template function)?

In case this is not possible, does anyone know why?

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2 Answers 2

this works (pun intended): this->template f<T2>();

So does

template <typename T>
struct B : A<T> {
  template <typename T2> void f()
  { return A<T>::template f<T2>(); }

  template <typename T2> void g() {
    f<T2>();
  }
};

Why using doesn't work on template-dependent template functions is quite simple -- the grammar doesn't allow for the required keywords in that context.

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+1, and a groan for the pun :) –  dappawit Mar 9 '11 at 5:03
    
Thanks, but both solutions do not really answer the question, as both are not simpler than saying A<T>::template f<T2>() in the first place. –  Lars Mar 9 '11 at 5:09
    
I think this is simpler, although that's a matter of taste of course. But it also allows virtual functions to be work as expected (although I see that is not an issue here). –  dappawit Mar 9 '11 at 5:13
    
@Lars: using is not simpler than A<T>::template f<T2>()... unless you are calling f() many times. In which case the wrapper function is also a simplification. –  Ben Voigt Mar 9 '11 at 7:21
    
I disagree. Of course I have the case in mind where you have many calls to f, not just one. So repeating A<T>::template or this->template all over the code is not very appealing. The wrapper solution is more complex than using because a) it is much longer, but more important b) you have to repeat the signature of f, so whenever you change f in the base class you have to do changes accordingly in the inheriting class (or: in all 10 inheriting classes...). I guess this is the reason why we have the using declaration at all. But why does it not work for templates? –  Lars Mar 9 '11 at 9:24

I believe you should use:

this->A<T>::template f<T2>();

or:

this->B::template f<T2>();

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