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I'm trying to get rid of the "#if TRACE" directives in my code, by using the Conditional attribute instead, but can't apply this approach easily to interfaces. I have a way round this but it's pretty ugly, and I'm looking for a better solution.

E.g. I have an interface with a conditionally compiled method.

interface IFoo
{
#if TRACE
    void DoIt();
#endif
}

I can't use the conditional attribute in an interface:

// Won't compile.
interface IFoo
{
    [Conditional("TRACE")]
    void DoIt();
}

I could have the interface method just call a conditional private method in the concrete class:

interface IFoo
{
    void TraceOnlyDoIt();
}

class Foo : IFoo
{
    public void TraceOnlyDoIt()
    {
        DoIt();
    }

    [Conditional("TRACE")]
    void DoIt()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Did it.");
    }
}

This would leave my client code with redundant calls to the 'nop' TraceOnlyDoIt() method in a non-TRACE build. I can get round that with a conditional extension method on the interface, but it's getting a bit ugly.

interface IFoo
{
    void TraceOnlyDoIt();
}

class Foo : IFoo
{
    public void TraceOnlyDoIt()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Did it.");
    }
}

static class FooExtensions
{
    [Conditional("TRACE")]
    public static void DoIt(this IFoo foo)
    {
        foo.TraceOnlyDoIt();
    }
}

Is there a better way to do this?

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Would using partial methods be useful for you here? –  Jeff Mercado Mar 9 '11 at 5:40
5  
I feel like if you're trying to do this to interfaces you might have a leaky abstraction somewhere. Trace information might be more of an implementation detail than an contract detail. –  R0MANARMY Mar 9 '11 at 5:47
    
@Jeff M: Can't see how? –  Ergwun Mar 9 '11 at 5:58
    
@ROMANARMY: Yeah, it's a pretty horrible interface. I'm just trying to sanitise it one step at a time. –  Ergwun Mar 9 '11 at 5:59
2  
+1 @ROMANARMY. A trace method shouldn't be appearing on an interface as it's an implementation detail. But if you're stuck with it, I'd use the #if ... #endif approach that you started with. –  Acentric Mar 9 '11 at 7:33
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A trace method shouldn't be appearing on an interface as it's an implementation detail.

But if you're stuck with the interface, and can't change it, then I'd use the #if ... #endif approach that you started with.

It is a rather savage syntax though, so I sympathise with why you might want to avoid it...

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What about this:

interface IFoo
{
  // no trace here
}

class FooBase : IFoo
{
#if TRACE
    public abstract void DoIt();
#endif
}

class Foo : FooBase
{
#if TRACE
    public override void DoIt() { /* do something */ }
#endif
}
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1  
But now he has to change all references to IFoo to FooBase in order to use his Conditional method... –  Acentric Mar 9 '11 at 10:02
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I would suggest you to use the null object pattern instead. I view conditional statements as a kind of code smell because they hide real abstractions. Yes you will get some extra method calls but these virtually have no impact on performance. In trace builds you can inject the TraceFoo, via a config file for example. This will also give you the capability to be able to enable it on non-trace builds as well.

interface IFoo
{
    void DoIt();
}

class NullFoo : IFoo
{
    public void DoIt()
    {
      // do nothing
    }
}

class TraceFoo : IFoo
{
    public void DoIt()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Did it.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm guessing the IFoo from the OP actually has some behaviours other than the DoIt method that he wants to remain on the interface. In which case, passing a "Null object" instead of the concrete class would lose some of the behaviour that he wanted to keep. –  Acentric Mar 9 '11 at 10:09
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