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For example suppose I have the following join

join on p.match_id = o.match_id

Could I specify instead that if p.match_id is even then

join on p.match_id = o.match_id - 1

But if it is odd then

join on p.match_id = o.match_id + 1

I have sequential match_id such that consecutive values represent a single match. Therefore to work out an opponent for a given match_id I need the above

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4  
If your data needs that, I'd be deeply concerned –  OMG Ponies Mar 9 '11 at 7:03
    
Is there any logic behind doing this ? you might think for alternative –  Hardik Mishra Mar 9 '11 at 7:06
1  
Well it does because I have sequential match_id such that consecutive values represent a single match. Therefore to work out an opponent for a given match_id I need the above –  deltanovember Mar 9 '11 at 7:07
    
@deltanovember: I'd think match_id identifies the game, but to identify the players you'd need something like player_id. Am I missing something? And if you wished to number them within a particular game, you could always have a player_num column additionally. –  Andriy M Mar 9 '11 at 7:15
    
match_id come in pairs and I need to work out how to pair them together. For example match_id 3 goes with 4 (=+1) whereas 10 goes with 9 (=-1) –  deltanovember Mar 9 '11 at 7:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Edited so it doesn't use CASE. The subquery returns a table with one field: matchid (equals match_id+1 when match_id is even and match_id-1 when match_id is odd).

SELECT matchid
  FROM ( SELECT match_id + 1 - 2*(match_id % 2)
                AS matchid
           FROM p
       ) AS p2
  JOIN o
    ON p2.matchid = o.match_id
;

Since you mention that you are using one table and 2 sequentials ids for one pair of opponents, you can also use the following as a subquery or a view:

SELECT match_id
     , ((match_id + 1) DIV 2) AS pair
  FROM p
;

It will give you a table that you can then collerate to itself:

| match_id | pair |
|     1    |   1  |
|     2    |   1  |
|     3    |   2  |
|     4    |   2  |
|     5    |   3  |
|     6    |   3  |
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clever and elegant thanks! –  deltanovember Mar 9 '11 at 7:33
1  
@deltanovember: pair here is essentially the game (match) id, which normally should be a foreign key. But that's your porridge, use your own spoon (or pick the one that suits you the best). :) –  Andriy M Mar 9 '11 at 8:10

If you want to join one table with another where the 2nd table's ID is even only, try this:

JOIN ON p.match_id = o.match_id AND o.match_id % 2 = 0

or where 2nd table's ID is odd:

JOIN ON p.match_id = o.match_id AND o.match_id % 2 = 1
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Hey, that's much better than my solution! Why didn't I think about that? –  Andriy M Mar 9 '11 at 7:10

I think if you wish to join on even p.match_id values only, you'll need to do that a bit differently:

join on p.match_id = o.match_id and p.match_id = p.match_id div 2 * 2

Similarly, if they should be the odd ones:

join on p.match_id = o.match_id and p.match_id = p.match_id div 2 * 2 + 1

But like others, I'm curious about why you would need that. An id column is only that, an id column. Normally you shouldn't be interested in the particular characteristics of the id column's value.

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