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I have a JUnit 4 test which creates test data and asserts the test condition for every single data. If everything is correct, I get a green test.

If one data fails the test, the execution of the whole test is interrupted. I would like to have a single JUnit test for each data. Is it possible to spawn JUnit tests programmatically, so that I get a lot of tests in my IDE?

The reason for this approach is to get a quicker overview which test fails and to continue the remaining tests, if one data fails.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It sounds like you'd want to write a parameterized test (that does the exact same checks on different sets of data).

There's the Parameterized class for this. This example shows how it can be used:

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class FibonacciTest {
    @Parameters
    public static Collection<Object[]> data() {
        return Arrays.asList(new Object[][] {{ 0, 0 }, { 1, 1 }, { 2, 1 }, { 3, 2 }, { 4, 3 }, { 5, 5 }, { 6, 8 } });
    }

    private final int input;
    private final int expected;

    public FibonacciTest(final int input, final int expected) {
        this.input = input;
        this. expected = expected;
    }

    @Test
    public void test() {
        assertEquals(expected, Fibonacci.compute(input));
    }
}                    

Note that the data() method returns the data to be used by the test() method. That method could take the data from anywhere (say a data file stored with your test sources).

Also, there's nothing that stops you from having more than one @Test method in this class. This provides an easy way to execute different tests on the same set of parameters.

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Hi Joachim, thank you very much for this very quick response. Sounds like it is exactly the solution to my problem. –  timomeinen Mar 9 '11 at 8:56
    
@Timo: if it was helpful, then you should generally hint at that by voting my answer up (or even accepting it). –  Joachim Sauer Mar 9 '11 at 9:08
    
Of course! I just wanted to check the solution for my problem. So: It works great! Thank you! –  timomeinen Mar 9 '11 at 10:07

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