Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is something that I have noticed in Android. If you restart the phone, you will find that the amount of free memory is more [say 190 mb in the case of HTC Wildfire]. As time passes by, the amount of free memory keeps reducing.

[This free memory I'm refering to is a statistic that i get from a TaskKiller app. I dont trust this app to kill my other applications, but use it to monitor my memory resources.]

Is it something wrong with the app that I am using or are there memory issues in android [for want of a better term].

And if yes, How I as a developer can stop this from happening.

share|improve this question
    
Is this a particular app you're using? If so, what is it called? –  SK9 Mar 9 '11 at 9:36
    
Well I have loads of them installed. I am what you might call a "geek". –  Anand S Mar 9 '11 at 9:46
    
Apps that I have on my phone –  Anand S Mar 9 '11 at 9:47
    
You made a reference to "the" app, which made me wonder if it was one in particular. As for being a geek, I think you're in good company here. –  SK9 Mar 9 '11 at 9:50
    
It looks like memory is being taken by background processes. It doesn't look like you need to worry this much. Have you checked what happens on a friend's device? –  SK9 Mar 9 '11 at 9:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't regard them as "issues" since Android is made in such a way that applications keep working in background. call it multi-tasking. and these applications cost you memory. ( I am assuming that you're referring to the RAM size)

When the phone starts, almost all of the apps are sleeping. slowly, background services such as sync and else start up, and they start occupying memory.

That's why you see a drop in free memory. I don't think there's something to worry about, since Android takes care of Memory Management very well.

Although, as a developer, you should create such an app which occupies as less memory as possible.

share|improve this answer

Sheikh Aman posted as I was typing this and covers a lot of what I was going to say - in particular about how any multi-tasking, multi-process system generally starts with the minimum and over time, due to user inter-action other components will be loaded up thus reducing free RAM etc.

As for actual memory leaks - it is possible in all systems for poor code to cause them so try to avoid apps which seem to display this behaviour. To avoid causing them yourself, this is a nice article which is worth reading...Avoiding Memory Leaks

share|improve this answer

I don't know if you are having any trouble with this in your app, but I have created a drop in solution that fixes all the android memory leak issues with standard android classes: http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=8488#c51

public abstract class BetterActivity extends Activity
{
  @Override
  protected void onResume()
  {
    System.gc();
    super.onResume();
  }

  @Override
  protected void onPause()
  {
    super.onPause();
    System.gc();
  }

  @Override
  public void setContentView(int layoutResID)
  {
    ViewGroup mainView = (ViewGroup)
      LayoutInflater.from(this).inflate(layoutResID, null);

    setContentView(mainView);
  }

  @Override
  public void setContentView(View view)
  {
    super.setContentView(view);

    m_contentView = (ViewGroup)view;
  }

  @Override
  public void setContentView(View view, LayoutParams params)
  {
    super.setContentView(view, params);

    m_contentView = (ViewGroup)view;
  }

  @Override
  protected void onDestroy()
  {
    super.onDestroy();

    // Fixes android memory  issue 8488 :
    // http://code.google.com/p/android/issues/detail?id=8488
    nullViewDrawablesRecursive(m_contentView);

    m_contentView = null;
    System.gc();
  }

  private void nullViewDrawablesRecursive(View view)
  {
    if(view != null)
    {
      try
      {
        ViewGroup viewGroup = (ViewGroup)view;

        int childCount = viewGroup.getChildCount();
        for(int index = 0; index < childCount; index++)
        {
          View child = viewGroup.getChildAt(index);
          nullViewDrawablesRecursive(child);
        }
      }
      catch(Exception e)
      {          
      }

      nullViewDrawable(view);
    }    
  }

  private void nullViewDrawable(View view)
  {
    try
    {
      view.setBackgroundDrawable(null);
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {          
    }

    try
    {
      ImageView imageView = (ImageView)view;
      imageView.setImageDrawable(null);
      imageView.setBackgroundDrawable(null);
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {          
    }
  }

  // The top level content view.
  private ViewGroup m_contentView = null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know about the nullViewDrawableRecursive function, but I thought even if you call the System.gc() function, it will only add a request to the garbage collector queue and not guarantee freeing up the garbage collector. Anyways, thanks a lot for the insight! –  Anand S Aug 8 '11 at 6:04
    
I know it's hard to believe, but try it, it works like a charm! :) –  swinefeaster Aug 8 '11 at 7:23

Android has garbage collection so at this level these aren't leaks. You don't need to worry.

share|improve this answer
    
You know that you still can leak memory? The GC just free objects that does not have any references anymore. If you have circular references or other references somewhere, the GC doesn't free them as you might expect... –  WarrenFaith Mar 9 '11 at 9:27
    
Yes I know. But this is not Anand's question. –  SK9 Mar 9 '11 at 9:29
    
But that still comes under the category of "How can I prevent it as a developer". Will keep that in mind! –  Anand S Mar 9 '11 at 9:33
    
His question was also, if some of his installed apps can cause memory leaks, which is quite possible... –  WarrenFaith Mar 9 '11 at 9:33
    
I'd write the app and then see if I'm leaking memory. Otherwise I'm probably worrying over nothing. –  SK9 Mar 9 '11 at 9:45

It could be that you have an app that is leaking memory, but more generally, for performance reasons modern operating systems such as Android will tend to use all available memory as cache memory, releasing it when an app requires it.

  • If you are running out of memory and apps are unable to start, then you may have a leak
  • If a particular app is using what appears to be too much memory, then you may have a problem

So long as you can still run the apps you need to, I wouldn't worry since Android is doing it's job.

As a developer, in theory, it's simple - don't use more resources than you need, and release them when you are finished with them. In practice however, we have varying degrees of success.

The Application Resources section of the dev guide is a good place to start, and there's usually good articles on the blog.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.