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I have written a function that needs to do a 64bit initialisation of memory for an embedded device. Can anyone tell me if this function will carry out this task?

void write64BitValueTo(void* address, U_INT64 pattern)
{

    int i;

    U_INT64 size = (0x20000000 / sizeof(U_INT64));

    //printf("Size = 0x%8X \n",size);
    U_INT64 *ptr = (U_INT64 *) address;

    for(i = 0; i< size; i++)
    {
        *ptr = pattern;
        ptr++;
    }
}
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possibly, but even if so you really should pass the size 0x20000000 as an argument. –  stijn Mar 9 '11 at 10:10
    
It writes the pattern over 512MB starting at the specified address. Is that what's wanted? –  Steve Jessop Mar 9 '11 at 10:12
    
Yeah this is just a test function the size will always be the same. –  JohnB Mar 9 '11 at 10:12
3  
Then it's fine, provided that strict aliasing doesn't ruin it. If you write memory using a U_INT64*, and the compiler somehow detects that for the remainder of the program you never access the memory using U_INT64* or any so-called "compatible type" (which in this case means U_INT64, INT_64 and char types), then it's allowed to conclude that the memory is unused after the write, and optimize it away. It's very unlikely that would happen in this case, but to be strictly safe you would have to write using an unsigned char*, which means 8 different values in a repeating pattern. –  Steve Jessop Mar 9 '11 at 10:19
2  
Don't use int as the type for your loop variable, but the same as for size. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 9 '11 at 10:34

2 Answers 2

You should declare ptr as volatile U_INT64 *ptr as the compiler could otherwise optimise away the assignment *ptr = pattern.

If it's important that the pattern is actually written to memory and not just the data cache (assuming there is one), then you should also flush the cache afterwards. Otherwise your code looks just fine.

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Er... How could the compiler possible optimize it away??? –  AnT Mar 15 '11 at 20:56
    
If the compiler sees that the stored values are not subsequently used, then it could optimise it away if the volatile qualifier is not used. In this case it is probably unlikely, as the function is not declared static. –  Frederico Mar 15 '11 at 21:47

It should work as long as address is properly aligned to allow storing 64-bit words on your architecture.

I'm curious: Why do you write

for(i = 0; i< size; i++)
{
    *ptr = pattern;
    ptr++;
}

when

for(i = 0; i < size; i++)
    *ptr++ = pattern;

is simpler and easier to write and read?

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